COMPLETE 2/22/1932 Alexandria Gazette GW 200th B-DAY Souvenir Edition

Ken Lopez
Posted by Ken Lopez on Feb 17, 2022 10:02:33 AM

My hope in posting this 1932 souvenir edition Alexandria Gazette is that you will be transported back 90 years to the celebration of George Washington's 200th birthday. The math is not hard, but the realization that just ten years from now, we will mark the 300th birthday celebration is MUCH harder on the brain. 

In the previous article, President Hoover is seen attending the parade described herein. No doubt, attendees of that parade held a copy of this very newspaper. I wonder whether we will see another U.S. president in Alexandria, Virginia, for the 300th birthday celebration. Hopefully, the Alexandria Gazette will publish a 300th commemorative edition.

I think the articles presented here, as well as the advertising, are captivating. I have attempted to scan the text from the newspaper, which I have placed below the images. My goal in doing so was to make the article easier to find using search. The technology I used does a much better job capturing the imagery than the text. Judge for yourself as you take a trip back 90 years to an entirely different generation.

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THE ALEXANDRIA GAZETTE-1

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Below is a very rough version of the text contained here. It's not meant to be used as a real guide. Rather it is to be used to help Google find this page.

 

 

 

The Alexandria Gazette

VIRGINIA SOUVENIR EDITION

in

Commemoration of

The 200th Anniversary of the Birth of

Her Illustrious Son

1732

1932

 

WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY IN ALEXANDRIA 100 YEARS AGO TODAY

 

Old Files of Gazette

Tell Details of Story

Relatives of Washington in Carrlages

Revolutionary Solders, Alexandria

Washington Lodge and Other Ma

sonio Lodges Form Part of

Elaborate

Parado

BY HISTORIUS

IF THERE happens

to

be more

excitement and

enthuslasmin

our city of Alexandria on the 22nd

of February, 1932, than there was

one hundred years ago, it will be

because there are more people now

than then, and not because,

in

degree,

the

excitement and

en-

thusiasm is any more Intense.

It

1s not every communlty that can

shake the dust off its old records

and ascertain what was done

a

century ago, but to do this in

Alexandria, we have only to con-

sult the files of the ancient Ga-

atte-and there it is.

The Year 1832

While It is true that, after the

manner of the time the account

is not so full of detail as we

might wish it to be, there is suf-

1clent to make an interesting tale,

and by reading between the lines,

we can easily reconstruct the stir-

ring scene.

For some days before the great

date,

the

Gazette carrled the

usual notice to the members of

the Washington Soclety, and

an

outline

of the

program

to

be

carried out:

Te

copy the record

(through several issues) word for

word:

Washington Society of Alexandria

"A meeting of the Society will

be held at Claggett's Hotel

Wednesday 22nd at 9 a, m.

on

The

Members of the Society are

MA.

quested to attend and unite in

the Centennial celebration of the

birthday of Washington.

WILLIAM L. HODGSON

The

the

committee

Secretary.

appointed

Citizens of Alexandria

by

and

the different socleties and assocla-

tons to make arrangements for

the celebration of the Centennlal

anniversary of Washington's birth-

day respectfully recommends:

That the dawn of the

dav

be

ushered to by the ringing of bells;

that the citlzens

ticable

As far

suspend

business

orne-

during

the day: that the Masters of Ves-

sals

nar

 

she day: that the Masters of ves-

gels in port querate their versels

with flags and the nallonal fag

be holsted In the publle

square

that the citlzens, socletes.

pub.

Ic officlals, etc,

assemble at

the

City Hotel in

time

to move

in

procession at 10 o'clock a. m

An

oration will be dellvered this dav

before the Citizens of Alexandria

In the First Presbyterian Church

by Thomas Semmes, Jr., Esq.

The

center of the church will be ap-

propriated exclusively to the ladles.

Gentlemen will not be admitted

until the arrival of the proces-

sion.

The Committee on Arrange-

ments and the Marshals will at-

tend to the proper disposition

of

the different societies and asso-

cations. Order of exercises at the

First Presbyterian

Church:

Music

Prayer

Oration

Music

Benediction

The

Societles

and

companieg

are requested to return from the

Church in the order in which they

entered, and to take up the line

of march under the command of

the Chief Marshall."

Order of the Dar

"Arrangements to be observed

In the celebration of the Centen-

nlal birthday of Washington.

The Chief Marshall appointed by

the Committees of the Citizens,

the military and the various so-

cities of the town o? Alexandria,

recommend the

following order

to be observed in the procession

on

the 22nd instant:

Civic Escort

Uniform Volunteer Companies

Alexandria-Washington Lodge

No. 22 and Other Lodges

Clergy and Orator of the Day

Washington Society

Relatives of Washington

la

Carriages

Revolutionary Officers and Soldiers

in Carriages

Mayor and Common Councll

General Committee

General Brigade and Suite on

Horse Back

Officers of the Army and Navy of

the United States

St. Andrews Society

Mechanics Relief Society

Hibernian Society

Captains and Seamen

Schools and Cltizens

The route the L.ocession

will

take and other particulars will be

announced in the general

order

on the 22nd instant.

The following

gentlemen have

been appcinted assistant Marshals

of the day: George Brent. William

A. Williams, James Irwin, Edgar

Snowden, C. A. Alexander, William

Dangerfield,

William L. Hodgson,

JOHN

WASHINGTON

Chief Marshall."

General Orders February 23, 1832

"The Chief Marshall directs the

Volunteer Companies, the Socletles,

Cltizens, etc., to assemble at 9:30

O'clock on Royal Street, in front

of the City Motel. At 10 o'clock

the procession to move

In

the

order above designated up King

Street. to Washington Street, down

Washington Street to Prince Street

 

 

down Prince to Falrfax and down

Fairfax to the First Presbyterian

Church.

"After

the

exercises

at

the

Church, the procession will return

to the City Hotel, where it will be

dismissed.

The

following

gen-

tlemen have been

appointed As-

sistant Marshals

of the

day-

George

Brent,

William

A.

Wil-

liams,

James

Irwin, Edgar

A.

Snowden,

C.

A,

Alexander,

Wil-

liam Dangerfield, William L. Hodg-

son."

The Celebration

(Alexandria

Gazette,

February

24th, 1832)

"The public procession formed

in

front

of the City Hotel-a

handsome civic escort under com-

mand of

G. P. Wise; our

five

volunteer

companies

Captain

Morris' company of artillery, Cap-

taln Page's company of Independ-

dent

Blues;

Captain

Brocket's

company

of

Independent

Volun-

teers,

Captain

Fitzhugh's

com-

pany

of Highlanders,

and

Cap-

tain

Kinsey's company

of Rifle

Guards.

The

procession

moved

to the first Presbyterian Church

where,

after

an

excellent prayer

by

the Rev.

Elias Harrison, an

oration was

delivered by

Thomas

Semmes, Jr., Esq.

Before the Volunteer Companies

were dismissed and the citizens

dispersed in front of the City

Hotel, G. W. P.

Custis, Esq., by

request,

from

the front of

the

City Hotel

addressed

his

fellow

citizens in his usual happy and

eloquent manner.

In

the

evening

the

annual

birthnight ball at Clagget's Hotel

was well attended.

National flags,

on the 22nd, were displayed from

the east and west fronts of the

museum.

The

beautiful standard

used

by

the

Civic Guard was

loaned from the Museum on this

occasion,

It

was

painted

and

presented

by

a granddaughter of

Washington,

40 years since, (Mrs.

E. P. C., wife of Major Lawrence

Lewis) to a company of Dragoons

of Alexandria, commanded by the

late Dr. E. C. Dick, which com-

posed

Washington's

bodyguard

during what is commonly known

by the name of The Whiskey In-

surr

ion

in

Western Pennsyl-

vall

This standard was subse-

quen.

bourne by

Captain

Wil-

liam F. Thornton's Troop of Cal-

vary of this place during the late

war.

by

whom it was

presented

to the museum."

"It was decided by the Execu-

tive

Committee

that

the

same

program and

order

of exercises

will be maintained for the cele-

bration of the Fourth of July,

1832, except that the services will

be held at the Second Presbyterian

Church, the oration to be delivered

by Thomas P. Coleman, Esq.'

 

Washington's
Business Perception
Washington was, in a sense, the
first greav American, because, hav-
ing. freed the Colonies, he was the
first to realize the importance
of
tying that Great Valley
of
the
Western waters to
the
East and
making a unity of what might have
become two nations divided by the
lateral range, or perhaps three, with
the Rocky Mountain barrier for an-
other boundary, as in Europe; or,
perchance a group of little Ameri-
can Balkans. He was the original
expansionist; not only the father of
his country, but the
"prophet of the
West.
Washington was a man of private
enterprise, the equal of our greatest
business magnates in his vision and
capacity,
He built the first grist
mill the other side of the mountains.
A few years later, when his large
sagacity
perceived that
the
de-
velopment of internal commerce was
one of the first needs of the new
country, at a time when he held no
public office, he became president
of a company for the exiension of
navigation on the :
. Potomac. The
Legislature of Virginia proposed to
give him a hundred and fifty shares
of stock.
Washington refused this,
O1°
any other kind of pay, saying
that he could serve the people better
in the enterprise if he were known
io have no selfish interest ln it. He
was not the kind of a man to recon-
cile himself to a gratuity (which is
the
Latinized
word
for
a
"tip"
offered to a person not in livery),
and if the modern methods of
"com-
ing in on the ground-foor"
and
"taking a rake off" had been ex-
plained and suggested to him,
we
suspect that he would
have
de-
scribed
them in
language
more
notable for its force than for its
elegance.

 

 

Fancy Dress Colonial Balls
In all parts of the Country,
to Mark Bicentennial Opening
Man Will be Elaborate Affairs With Picturesque Set-
tings of Powdered Wigs and Handsome
Colonial Costumes
President and Mrs. Washington Receiving
the Revolutionary
of George Washington are
taking
the form of pageants, plays,
and
costume balls.
Seemingly unable to wait for the
actual
birth-date,
organizations
from one end of the country to
the
other began
celebrating
early in
January,
with hundreds of events
scheduled for the time before and
after February 22,
According
10
the United States
George
Washington
Bicentennial
Commission, many cities have
9-
ready
begun the
festivitles wich
Colonial balls, and others are mak-
sin8
their
plans. Important
in
these is the Beaux Art Ball in New
York On
January 22, which
soclety
leaders
O
nil
important citles
tended.
Idle
The
Bicentennial Ball
Mayflower
dote
Washington,
D.
C.
sponsored
DV
the
United
States
George Washington BIcen-
tennial Commission.
to be held on
the night or Februarv
22, will also
be
attended by prominent
society
leaders from
every
states n
the
Union.
The All States Society will
hold a ball that night in the Shore-
ham Hotel, and the New England
States Society in the Willard Hotel,
with dozens of other Costume balls
in other Daces in
Capital.
the National
One or the most attractive events
scheduled for February 22 is the
ball to be given in historic Gadsby's
Tavern in Alexandria, Virginia,
producing the last Birthnight ball
which General Washington attend-
ed in this very tavern.
The guests
attending the ball in 1789 will be
represented on this occasion by their
descendants, many in the actua.
costumes wor1 at that time.
Larchmont.
New
York,
h98
elaborate plans under war for
grand Coloma Bal to be held at
the Larchmont Shore Club, Febru-
ary
22, in which all the young set
will participate to make it one of
the most successful social events of
the year
Committees
drafted
strom
the
civic and patriotic organizations of
Ossining, New York, are arranging
for a ball to be glven on February
22,
when the authentic costumes or
the verlod in the
Dossession~
scores
residents
ne
the town,
will be brought cut for the occa
slon.
In Brooklyn, New York, the Bat-
tle Pass Chapter of the D. A. R
gave a fashion show of the Colontal
Deriod on January 15, when the par
telpants represented such lights of
era
as Martha
Washington, Mrs. Alexander Ham-
ilton,
MrS.
others,
John
Adams,
and
"A Costume Ball of the Spirit of
"96" will open festivities In Albanj,
New York, on
February 22.
The
ball will mark the conclusion of a
day of celebrations by the state
Commission, and will be the most
elaborate affair ever attempred in
Albar. Al guests
will
be COS-
tumed either in Military or Civic
dress of the Revolutionary period,
Petite
Dutch
girls,
direct
de.
scendants of the early settlers of
Aibany, will
con
serve the buffet lunch-
at midnight. Various pageant
episodes will mark the opening
the
- Dull
number
culminating
In
a unal
baren
when all guests will take purt
in
wIll evolve
Itsell into genernl danc-
ing
depicting
the
first Inaugural
ball.
During the period
Of
inter-
mIssion
at
midnlght,
musical
will
a chorus of 200 voices
stage an
allegorical
historical
pubean6 In the nature of a surprise
offering.
The Tenth Regiment Armory In
Albany, New York, will be the scene
or a costume ball on tobruary 22.
when the musicians and attendants
will appear in the Colonial livery.
St. James, New York, enjoyed a
ball cn February 20 in The Old
Fire Hall which was a costume al-
falr
tableaux,
songs,
and
stories depicting scenes
from the
life
of Washington, with Incidental
music and dances of that period.
SChe proceeds are to be devoted to
the
sneedv
Of
806
Neconset.
The City
Committee in Syra-
cuse, New York, Is planning a Col-
onial ball to be
glen sometime
after
Easter.
Newport,
Rhode
Island, will also give a Bicentennial
Dal ater
Easter.
The
Newport
Lodge No. 104, Benevolent and Pro-
lective Order of Elks, will be hosts.
Ramsey, New Jersey, will glve a
pageant centered around the bat-
tle of Brandywine.
This will be
given by the Village Improvement
Assocation
At
the Symphonic
Pageant given January 10 at Sym-
phony Hall in Boston, the second
part of the program was devoted to
earlv
American
tableaux,
taken
from famous paintings
A Yankee Doodle Ball at the Ho-
tel St. Regls, New York City, on
January 22,
was In keeping
with
the Bicentenntal spirit, the pro-
(Turn to Page 7, Col. 1, Sec.

 

 

TEN ALEXANDRIA GNETTZ
Many Important Parts Played by
Women in the American Revolution
Memories of
Hero
ines Live Through-
out the Ages
VIRGITA SOUVENR EDITION
Celebrating Washington's Birth, We Offer.
WASHINGTON'S DESK
of the Desk Ba Used at Federal Hall, New Yer
For Your Home $49.75
MICHELBACH
The
shoma
Furniture in Historin

 

"Washington's Home Town"
CITY
OF
ALEXANDRIA
WELCOMES YOU!
"Here, Washington in a civil, political, fraternal, military and religious sense, mingled with his
neighbors and these associations have left an enduring impression upon the town and neighboring coun-
try. He was its representative in the House of Burgesses, a member of its Town Council and of its magisterial
court. He surveyed its streets, established its fire department and first free school, worshipped in its Epis.
copal Church and was Master of its Masonic Lodge.
When the end came Alexandria onvsicians ministered
to his dying wants, Alexandria citizens formed his funeral cortege, Alexandria Masons and ministers per-
formed their rites and Alexandria militia fired the only military salute over the bier of their lamented
neighbor.
Sojourn
With Us During The Bicentennial
This historic old town, while proud of its historical background and its endearing memories, is forg-
ing ahead at a rapid pace.
Natural resources are being developed and new manufacturing plants, attracted
by its water and rail facilities and beautiful homes are being built within its recently enlarged area. As a
most desirable place to live and do business, Alexandria is amone the foremost in the country.
CITY
OF
ATEXANDRIA.
VA

 

 

PAGE -4, SEC.

VIRGINIA SOUVENIR EDITION

THE

ALEXANDRIA

GAZETTE

A COMPLETE RECORD AND DESCRIPTION OF CHURCHES ATTENDED BY GEORGE WASHINGTON

 

From Babyhood Washington was Reared with a Deep Reverence for Church Teachings;

from both Parents and Their Ancestry for Many Hundred Years Back, He

Inherited a Profound Reverence for Church; He Rarely Missed an

Opportunity to Attend Services, Even when Travelling

 

 

By EDNA M. COLMAN

CHURCH held hish place in the

• schedule of living of George

Washington from earliest childhood.

This was largely due to the import-

ance of the church in the social

fabric of Colonial times, particular-

ly the church of England recognized

as the state church of the colonles

as well as of the mother country,

A deep regard for religious ob-

servances and church' attendance

was a matter of Washington and

Ball family traditions, as both of

the parents of •George Washing-

ton had ancestral lines of landed

gentry dating back many hundred

years and each could claim many

scholars, lawyers and clergymen as

well as gallant soldiers as their

forbears.

Born

into a

deeply

religious

home, young George was baptized,

it is said, at old Yeocomico church

with a full complement of god-

parents, and the Rev. Lawrence

Butts officlating. In the National

Musuem at' Washington,

D.

C.,

may be seen a little age yellowed,

brocade sik christening palm

or

robe, lined with the softest silk,

once a delicate rose pink, in which

his proud young mother wrapped

her first born

for his baptismal

ceremony.

There also may be seen

the silver bowl used as a font, for

this service.

Both robe and bowl

were used many times in later

years in slmilar ceremonies for lit.

tle Washingtons and Lewises and

their near of kin.

Thus George knew old Yeocomico

from babyhood and from the old

home at Bridges Creek, now called

Wakefield and just recently restored,

come glimpses of stalwart Captain

Washington,

and his handsome

stately second wife, riding to Church

at Yeocomico in their family car-

riage with little George on a foot-

stool at his mother's feet.

After Captain

Augustine moved

his little family to the house on

the Epsewasson estate, which

gave to his eldest son, Lawrence,

who named it Mount Vernon,

he

served as vestryman in Turo Par-

ish, using his influence to secure

the appointment of

the

Rev.

Charles Green as minister of the

Parish. Records of the parish show

his attendance at vestries during

1736 and 1737.

When George was

about seven

and already expert in riding his

pony, the

family

moved to the

farm on the Rappahannock, where

Captain Augustine became a

vestry-

man

or

ISTA

George's Church

in

Fredericksburg, serving until his

untimely death in 1748.

For the

balance of her lifetime his widow

made

St.

George's her church

home.

When in

later years her

distinguished son

visited her and

his sister, Mrs. Lewis, he

• found

pleasure in worshipping

in

this

church of tender memories of child-

hood and boyhood.

George some-

times accompanted his mother on

her visits to her relatives and thus

became familiar with St. Mary's

White Chapel in Lancaster county,

Virginia, where his mother had at-

tended as a girl when living with

her sister, Mrs. Bonum and the

family of George Eskridge, her

guardian, at Sandy Polnt. In the

little churchyard are many stones

marking the graves of members of

the Ball family. There one notes

the repetition of the family motto-

"Coelumque

tueri,"

which trans-

lated 1s "aspire to Heaven or Seck

the things which are above."

Mrs.

Washington's

deep

piety

was characteristlc of her through

life.

She

trained

her

children

from the

Bible

and from

Sir

Matthew

Hale's

Contemplations

Moral and Divine. This book of re-

ligious philosophy, which was her

lifelong companion she found at

Bridges Creek on her arrival there

as a bride.

The fly leaf bore the

inscription of her predecessor, Cap-

tain Washington's first wife, "Jane

Butler Washington."

With

the

strong common

sense for

which

she was also noted she wrote her

own name, "Mary Ball Washing-

ton," beneath it and proceeded to

continue its use

with

her

two

young

stepsons, until their father

sent them to England to school.

After the family returned from its

dreary pilgrimage to the old home

to lay the beloved husband and

father to rest with his fathers in

the little cemetery, Mrs. Washing-

ton

placed

upon

eleven-year-old

George, the duty and responsibility

of

reading family

prayers and

saying grace at table, since he was

head of the family.

The habit of

attending church services was not

abandoned by this youth when he

was away from home, for he found

his

way

to a

little chapel near

Greenway

Court while surveying

for Lord Fairfax.

In the Braddock campaign it fell

to young Col. Washington to read

the burial service over the body of

the unfortunate English general,

and during the French and Indian

War there was little time and less

opportunity for church going in the

wilderness, but records show that

young Colonel Washington heeded

the influence of his Christian up-

bringing as he saw to it that re-

ligious services were held for his

men, reading the services himself

when a chaplain was not available.

He was unusually broad-minded in

his sectarian views, and grew more

so as he grew older, attending with

equal reverence the services in the

Quaker, Dutch, Catholic,

Presby-

terian and Congregational churches

ds

well as his own, the Episco-

pallan.

Every crists in Washington' life

proved

for

anew

his

Christian

faith

each emergency found

him

funess for the benefits he had re-

celved.

His diary reveals numerous

expressions of his gratitude to God

for preservation from disaster, and

for his success in his military ex-

periences.

He attended church on

Sundays wherever he happened to

find himself if a church was within

reach unless the weather and the

roads offered too great obstacles.

After his marriage to Mrs. Mar-

tha Custic following his resigna-

tion from the military service, he

became a member of the house of

Burgesses and for the next sixteen

years lived the life of a country

squire.

In consequence he became

a regular church goer. During the

sessions of the Burgesses in Wil-

liamsburg he and Mrs. Washington

and the Custis children

attended

Bruton Church and St. Peters of

New Kent.

This last was the fam-

lly church of the Dandridges and

there it was that

the Reverend

Mossum united Martha Dandridge

in

marriage

to

Daniel

Custis,

Shortly

Squire Washington

Was

elected vestryman in Truro Parish

and also was church warden and

trustee.

In this capaclty he ren-

dered many practical services to the

four churches

of the Parish

of

Truro, later

divided into Fairfax.

These were Pohick, Falls Church,

Payne's Church and Christ Church

at Alexandria.

His duties as ves-

tryman were faithfully and con-

scientiously discharged.

He made

surveys, drew plans, secured esti-

mates of building supplies and in

construction wak.

Parish records

show. his attensance at twenty-

three vestry meetings in eleven years

and the eight he missed was owing

to illness or absence from the vI-

cinity.

Beginning in 1785, he wor-

shipped at Christ Church, Alexan-

dria, more

frequently

than any-

where

else.

He bought a

large

family pew the day the building

was turned over to the vestry.

The Presbyterian Meeting House

in Alexandria also had Gen. Wash-

ington as an attendant at times.

His physician, Dr. Cralk, his old

friend, John Carlyle, and many

other close Masonic associates were

members there.

Among other Vir-

ginia churches attended by Gen-

eral Washington at various times

during his public and private life

were:

St. John's, Richmond, where

he went to listen to the Inspiring

oration of Patrick Henry ending in

his dramatic appeal-"Give me Lib-

erty or Give me Death"; Lamb's

Creek Church; St. Paul's of King

George County; Nomini, of West-

moreland;" Aquia,

St.

Luke's are

also sald to have the distinction of

his. service under their roofs but

there is no record in his diary men-

toning them,

although he made

frequent reference to having

at-

tended church without naming the

building visited.

During his frequent visits

to

Annapolis, Maryland, he is record-

ed as having attended the services

conducted by the Reverend Jona-

than Boucher, who was tutor for a

time to Jacky

Custls.

Reverend

Boucher was rector of St. Anne's

and later of St. Barnabas, at Lee-

land, Maryland.

It is said that

General Washington heard his ser-

mons in both churches but it was to

St. Barnabas, called Queen Anne

Church, that the General accom-

panied Governor

Eden.

Boucher

a Tory who became so unpopu.

lar because of his Tory principles

and the persistence of his efforts

to enforce an old law of the vestry,

taxing all bachelors of the parish

over twenty-five years of age. His

ministerial service must have been

(Turn

to Page 5, Col. 4, Sec.

AJ

 

 

FALLS CHURCH (Episcopal)

Long before anyone thought of a settlement at Falls Church, there

of two old roads.

One. went trom

Bitte Falle

Palis Church, named for the falls of the Potomac, was in the parish

In which George Washington was vestryman.

He attended to its

affairs,

and was regular at vestry meetings, occasionally attending Sunday

services.

The present building was begun in 1763, completed in 1769.

About

hundred iveare

after the

first little

church was built a little

town

grew up around the old church and took its name

NOMINI, CHURCH, WESTMORELAND COUNTY, VA

"The

bullding now standing was

erected on the

exact site

•Ittle Colonial Church

of

the

which George Washington

attended

on May

just

22nd

and also August

28,

1768.

It

IS

about ten miles from the little

Church where he is sald to have been baptized,

YEOCOMIC CHURCH, WESTMORELAND COUNTY

This

quaint little church replaced the first structure on this site

IM

1663-54

when the church

was founded

The

rebuilding

Of

brick

occurred in 1706.

Mary Ball, later the mother

of Gearge Washington,

attended services at Yeocomic when a child and also as a young lady

midtre horseback from Sandy

Point when living with the family

of

her guardian, George Eskridge.

15 als0 claimed that she

Was mar

Fled in

this church and had her first

- babe. George,

baptized

there.

While these facts cannot be

19 belleved that George Washington attended services there

Ine boyhood and in later years,

when close br.

 

 

 

CHRIST CHURCH, SAVANNAH, GEORGIA

Whenever President Washington found himself where he could pass

& Sabbath in a town or

city he made it a

practice of attending church,

often

houses of worship the same

day.

ST, JOHN'S CHURCH, YORK, PA.

so Tradition claims that General Washington desired to attend services

this church while in the city, but waited at

the door vainly for,

•the

mister to appear.

Being a missionary, with several charges, his time

ST. GEORGE'S CHAPEL, CHARLESTOWN, W.

VA.

r.= Only

the ruins

of this, the first church crected

west of the Blue

Ridge Mountalhs.

Like Harewood the home

of

Charles Washington,

from whom Charlestown was named, It was built of native limestone.

Norberna Femal? Dingfiana,

to give the date

of its rection as it was i

part of

where the records were kept.

However.

legend places its building about 1760.

The furniture was brought trom

England.

General Genige Washington

worshipped here during

visits

to

his brother's family,

It had a roof of sheet lead which was con-

vested-into bullets during the Civil War

 

 

 

OLD ST. JOHN'S CHURCH (EpIs-

copal) RICHMOND

In this quaint old church, built

1740.

was

held

the

Virginia

Convention during

which Patrick

Henry's fearless inspiring

appeal

to

his

countrymen

to

fight

for

their independence of the mother

country and her oppressions ended

with

"Give Me Libertv or Give. Me

Death,

George

Tashington

was

present

among

the

delegates.

Shortly the responsibility of lead-

ing

his

people in their struggle

for

liberty

was

placed

upon

his

shoulders

in

the

Philadelphia

Convention.

TRINITY CHURCH, NEW

YORK

CITY

This

church

proudly

claims

President

Washington

as

an at-

tendant at its services.

PAn

old

square dew

reserved for

the

uSA

of him

and his family is still kept

sacred to his memory.

Trinitv Church has an interest.

ins historr

It was foundad and

the

first

little

edifice

built

in

1697.

In

1-33. Oueen Anne

gaVe

it a large tract of property, called

Queen Anne's farm.

This was re-

named Church farm.

The church

was

popular and fashionable and

hv 1737 it had become so crowded

that two chapels, St. George's and

St. Paul's, were built to take care

of the overflow.

Trinity is the

richest church

society

in America.

'Tre

inoome

is over

a million

dollars

and eight chapels.

The

present

structure

is

the

third to be built on the site.

rhe

one Geo.

Washington visited

was

built in 1790, and pulled down in

1839.

Graves

of

notables

mav be sean

in

the churchvard.

Alexander

Hamilton

and.

Capt.

James Lawrence are among

them.

 

 

ST. MICHAEL'S

CHURCH

LITCHFIELD, CONN

Visited during President Wash-

ington's New England tour.

三9驾

ST.

MICHAELS,

CHARLESTON

SOUTH CAROLINA

The bells of St. Michaels pealed

their joyous welcome to the first

president of the United States on

his arrival at Charleston, S. C.

He

viewed the city from the windows

is its spire.

 

 

 

S

d

MAI

1 -

VITO

POHICK CHURCH IN TRURO PARISH (In George

Washington! Day'

Church

the

on't

one

Truro Parish

ula¢

of

ale

Darien

original four

churches

Church,

unuren

Christ

churei

of

nE

includec

sin

Payne

Parish.

General

sTairfay

ashington

and

vestryman

the

Parisn

sona

wnico

vestry

of

each

are

four

enuren

business required

churches as ther

darles

He

cairueth

had Dasgec

when

le

al!

arst chosen

within

gubscribed to the

Truro' Parish

teachings'oethe

snow nimsell

church in

qual

ned

order

serve in

the

administration

of

He presented a

nis

Fonlck tothe restrv and served

office.

Ing

committee.

He

presented tn

Cne

on Its build-

on

the

alar niece

ofthe 3

In

carved

eleven

oraments

rearg

vestry meetings.

•Of

LO

8 others held luis absencer

23

illness or to his being out of state.

vere

du

Pohick is close to Gunston Hall

~然

POHICK CHURCH TODAY

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, KING GEORGE COUNTY, VIRGINI

Washington attended service here May 29, 1768

 

 

OLD ST. PETERS, NEW KENT

This church

was bought in 1703 at a cost of 146,000 pounds of

tobacco

(then

the

currency

of

Virginia)

It

was attended

by

the

Custis and Dandridge families and legend claims that it was in this littie

church that Daniel Custis and Martha Dandridge were married in 1749.

Martha's

and tactful charm

won

the heart

of

her

get his son to marry hig

cousin,

the lovely and unhappy Evelrn Bird.

who

went to an

early

grave

mourning a lover her stern father would not let her marry be-

cause of religious differences.

LAMB'S

CREEK CHURCH, KING GEORGE COUNTY. VIRGINIA

On September

Church or at St. Paul's in the samo County

. 1768 Washington attended service: possibly at this

 

 

 

the day made his way to a Congre-

gational house of worship.

He did

this at Portsmouth, N. H., and also

at Litchfield.

To Wetherfield, he

was accompanied in state by the

Governor

Church going Was

also part of

his

program

during his famous

Southern tour in the summer of

1791. His diary carried many nota-

tions of churches observed and vis-

ited as well as the factories, schools

and all industries, of each place on

his itinerary. The principal church-

es which have found a

definite

mention in his own record of at-

tending Divine service on this re-

markable

journey of 1,887 miles,

made in his big cumbersome state

coach were, St.

Phillip's

and St.

Michael's at Charleston, S. C., and

Christ Church in Savannah.

Undoubtedly

there

are

other

churches than these listed which

proudly

claim the honor of a visit

from the Father

of His Country,

and whose names should be added

to any list of churches associated

eyer so slightly with hls presence.

but because his religtous views and

professions were so wholly a per-

sonal and

individual matter

with

General Washington, the records of

his church going are disappointing-

ly meager.

 

hurches

Honored

by

Washington

s

Attendance

Continued

fromt

Pare

Beg.

difgcult experience.

He wrote of

For more than six months

eached (when I dld preach) with

palr of loaded pistols lying on

1e cushion,

having given notice

at if any man or men were so

ost to all sense of decency as to

rag me out of my pulpit I should

hink myself justified before God

and

man in repelling violence."

His congregations finaly became so

incensed that. he was prevented by

armed

force from entering

the

pulpit.

His property was confis-

cated and the last ship to sail from

Annapolis to England, before the

hostilities of the Revolution began,

carried Dr. Boucher and his wife to

his homeland.

St. Barnabas Church is two hun-

dred and twenty-seven years old. It

was donated in 1704 by John and

Mary Duval

"to be her majestie's,

Queen Anne, her heirs and succes-

sors for the use of the parish and

a churchyard forever."

St. John's,

Broad Creek,

Mary-

land, was also attended at various

times by George Washington.

Built

- first of logs in 1694, It antedated

all other Episcopal churches of the

Potomac region of Maryland.

An-

other historic Maryland church that

claimed George Washington as a

worshipper is Old Durnam Church

in Charles

County.

This

church

dates back to 1692, but the pres-

ent bullding was erected the year

that George Washington was born.

It was close to the home of Gen-

eral Smallwood,

close friend of

General Washington, who rendered

distinguished service in the Revo-

lution and

also as

Governor of

Maryland. He was a vestryman of

Durham

and a

frequent host to

General Washington.

During the Revolution,

General

Washington

gave

a

number

of

churches the honor of his attend-

ance. In Cambridge and in Boston

he attended two churches the same

day,

usually the Episcopal in the

morning and the Congregational or

Presbyterian in

the

afternoon or

evening.

While in Litchfield dur-

ing the war his deep regard for the

church was shown by the reproof

he gave some soldiers who threw

stones at the old Litchfield church.

He said,

"I am a churchman and I

like not to see the church thus dis-

honored and desolated.

Other places where he stopped

during the Revolution also claim

church attendance.

Newport, Mor-

ristown,

and

Trenton

all

have

church traditions which place Gen.

Washington in their midst at least

for one service.

While President of

the United States living in New

York he and his famlly appeared to

divide their time between St. Paul's

and Trinity, both Episcopal.

While

the presidential residence

was in

Philadelphia,

the chief executive

was most

regularly

at

Christ

Church and St. Peter's, although on

one or two occasions he attended

the Quaker Meeting House and St.

Mary's Catholic Church,

During his tours of the country,

to New England, which he started

October 15, 1789, he not only at-

tended church

wherever

Sunday

happened to find him near one but

he also noted in

his diary

the

churches he saw and visited.

In

New Haven he visited Trinity Epis-

copal, in the forenoon and later in

 

 

OLD DURHAM CHURCH' IN CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND

This is another historic house

of worshin.

As

far back as

1692

+here va

little log church on the site of the present building which

will celebrate

its 200th anniversary

1932 for

it was built the year

that George "Washington.

was born.

This church was

founded

when

Maryland

colony

divided

Into

30

orieinal

barisnes

a10

wien

the

Episcopal

Churen

called the

Church of England was organized as the

Church

Maryland.

This

Time

200

Te2j old

bullding is forty

miles from Washinston

the. boast of havinz

nad George

Washington as

a worshiper

with

his Chief of Staff, General Smallwood. who was later Governor of Mary-

land and also

vestryman of Durham.

It also has an ancient challce

and paten, called

ine

oldest communion silver in

America.

If 19

about

fire

miles

strom

the

Smallwood mansion on

tha

Maryland

side

or rhe

Mattwoman Creek.

PAYNE'S CHURCH, TRURO PARISH

One

of the

four

terest

Vestir

and

service

25

churches claiming George Washington's:

meetinz in

man

1=66 at

whion

Truro Parish.

active In-

Payne s

plans

ere

He attended

Church

the

made for

This : Episcopal

and

was made

an

tne

inspector

Or the

building

ni

Baptists,

Church

property

later

construction

nei

na

don

pr

7188 pm

became

work.

the

tim

A i

Tad destroved during

Baptisi

nossession

Church,

Of

the

building

winter quarters

«Tor

Civil

H'ad

ar

New

schoni

a.t

and its material

ne

eral soldiers.

used

in

Oin sf Wanfsi

OLD

ST

MARY'S

CHURCH IN

CATHOLIC

PHILADELPHIA

Among the churches immortal-

zed through

menton

bY.

George

Washington

in

his diaries

record.

ing attendance

services

110

roof,

Catholic

is

Old

St.

Mary!

Church

Philadelphia.

This

little

brick

church

is

sturdy

and

as

it

has

still

been

almost

TIVO

hundred

rears.

It

WaS (0

St.

eral

Mars',

that

Gen-

Washington

Marquis

de

came

with

the

Lafayette

who sought

blessing

upol

their

Journet

to

the

plans

for

Yorktown

the

outcome

Of

their

and

efforts

to

end the Revolution.

To St.

Mary's

they

came

again

for

Tne

to

give

thanks

Victory at

In

Mer

Torktown.

churchyard

America's

some

great

of

patriots,

Once the

phia,

the

Cathedral of Phlladel-

changing

city's life

tide

of

the

has left it to be

side

waY-

shrine rich

in

historic

2850

ciations.

CHRIST CHURCH,

ALEXANDRIA,

VIRGINIA

Christ

Church

In

Washington

Alexandria

Tuae

was one of the first

completed in

1773.

the largest sum,

to purchase

George

tentv-six pounds, ten

-DeW

and for it he raid

Before the Revolution, George

shillings and eight pence

tween

this

an

at

almost

Christ churchivashington

Pohick Church

but

after the

ne.

arine

General

exclusively

For

worshiped

many

reare

nas

1765.

Mas

He

mamber

been

of

ine

vestry for a time

was deeply interested in its construction.

in

Many notable

servinge

one

of

these

and

Revolution

conducted by

events took place

in

the

Rector.

Dr.

Christ Church,

ar

(ne

Griffith had been

departure

of the

with General

British

from

Washington

Gritichnolfer

the

our

was the one

to

warn him of Lea

*g

through

Dr.

the

fully

decorated

treachers

The

Revolution,

with

flowers

figure of a dove bearine au

and

olive

evergreens

church

1a s

Desuu-

and

ovar

the

pulpit

the

In

door,

the summer

branch,

symbolized the

De200

surrounded

George

br

his.

friends

Washington

service.

stood

airfax Resolves strong upon

and neighbors.

aC

the

the

church

George

Innuence

the

him and advised the renunciation

of

IlL and announced that ne

the

Colonies.

It

19

an

this

interestine

would fight for

The

KInE

church,

confirmed

fact,

Independence

of

br

was here

Bishop

Robert

lee

lead In

was a

memo

War

conflict.

that he made his decision

1852

of

and

8a10

to stand with his state in

he

pews

Civil

the

Washington

silver plates and shown

LO

all

and lee ramllies

VIsitors

are

marked

with

 

TRINITY

CHURCH

IN

NEW

PORT,

R.

Whlle General George Washing-

New

where

hah sons el' meet Rochambera.

he

he

attended

Trinity

Church,

March

11. 1751.

The hm•

Enelleh

ran

amar

2100

th

1n2 from Cheraneake Bar

OLD CHAPEL NEAR GREENWAY COURT

Lord

mirTein

Th

'niomar

10 the

attended nr

roung George Washington

frACT

of

land

belonging

tC

tne

12 n0

soninrised

300.0

Heres

and Rapnahannock Rivers,

and extend

Shenandoah Valley.

CHURCH,

61.

cHARbsTov.

To

this

murel

T'r

resident

WARN

istor

rowed

molaInf

kaVI

-DAISt

hoir

church saa

patriole SonEA

WIN

•oraled

the

This

cily

1791

part

of

'he

church

old.

Caneri

Warlinglol

southeri

replacel

fail

which

enurel

bhe

C'arolinar

WeIr

And

mambare

- la congregation

an0

their graves are

in

vita come

TAI

OLD LITCHFIELD CHURCH

To

churn belongs

'ashington legend

of the Revolu.

tion

duri

Revolutionary

war

some

soldiere

a!

cnuren

and

were promptly rebuked

by

General

Mashin

zIOn

anO

sain

churchman and wish not

*A BA LIE

Church dishonored and desolated in this manner

ST. MART'S WHITE CHAPEL, LANCASTER COUNTY

This

• church was

attended by Mrs,

Augustine Washington.

In

the

cemetery are many

monuments

LO

various members

of the Ball

family. and

SOT

trem

noten

the

repetition

of

ine famil

motto

Coelumous ruerl,

whien

15 translated

And look to Heaven'

"Seek

ene

thines

phien are

abore

family

legend carries the story

81e

olde

son George

with her. when

requently brought

chap

stoo al ner

• feet in the family carriaze.

later riding

horseback Desice.

here

ST. PAUL'S EPISCOPAL CHERCH

{LU

This quaint

old Chapel,

DelwAGI

Eulton,

and

Churen

streets,

the

0 d681

churco bulldinz

the

City

of

SILa

cornersion

chen

laid was in 2 wheat

Meld in 1764.

Later

Rias

the

military

chapel

of the

= British

commander.

•Lord

Howe worshiped here and a num-

her of British officers were buried

menurenvar

After

ine

inauguration

nies.

first

President

George

Washington, led

the W0018

assem.

DIREe

- that

nad

winessod

his

taking oatn as the rirst execulive

the new limited

smatos.

on

foot

10 St. Paul's Chapel,

where Bishop

read

Praters

and

scrig.

approplate nature.

•nis

fAlicious observance

The firS?

inaugural service was concluded.

 

 

 

 

THE ALEXANDRIA GAZETTE

HE HAD INHERITED

A

PAGE 5, SEC.

VIRGINIA SOUVENIR EDITION

TRADITION OF DEEP REGARD FOR RELIGIOUS SERVICE AND TEACHINGS

 

 

CHRIST

CHURCH.

PHIA, PA

PHILADEL

This

church was

more

nearly

the

church

home

of

President

Washington's family during their

residence

in

Philadelphia

than

any

other

and. it is believed that

he

worshiped

there

longer

and

with more regularity

than is true

of

any

church.

excepting

Christ

Church of Alexandria. This church

was designed

the

architect of

Independence Hall.

Francis

Hop-

kinson,

one

of the signers of the

Declaration of Independence,

waS

the

organist.

-Two

rears

before

General Washington bécame Pres

ident,

William. White became Rec-

tor.

He was

called the Father of

American Churches,

TRINITY CHURCH

IN

NEW

HAVEN

While

in

New

Haven,

Gen-

eral Washington attended Trinity

Church for one service and one of

• the

Presbyterian

meeting

houses

in

the evening.

He also drove to

Wetherfield for divine service.

OLD PRESBYTERIAN MEETING HOUSE, ALEXANDRIA,

TA

Erected in 1774 partially destroyed by fire in 1836 and rebuilt. on

the same walls in the same year.. In this building the Free Masons of

Alexandria held their first religious ceremony on the anniversary of

Saint John the Evangelist in 1783.

Its pastor, Rev. James Muir was

Chaplain of Alexandria-Washington Lodge No. 22 for a number of years;

In this office he performed the religious service of the Lodge at General

Washington's funeral. It Is said that Washington sometimes attended

divine services here:

In its little cemetery over thirty. Revolutionary

patriots are buried, among them Dr. James Craik, family: phygician of

the Washington family and Surgeon General' of the Continental Army.

CHRIST CHURCH,

CAMBRIDGE

Where General Washington' often

attended divine services, durin

he stay there as Commander in Chlef of the Continental Army,

 

QUEEN'S CHAPEL.

ST.

PARISH, PORTSMOUTH, N.

JOHN

Records give

Two

churches

tended by

at-

President Washington

during his

brief

niouth.

stay

in

l'ortS-

One of

inese was

Queen's

cnapel,

erected in

• 1732

berry Bank

sOR

Siraw.

of

Queen

and.

named

in

honor

Caroline.

ington

and

Gen.

Wash-

the

Governor's

Tobias Lear occupied

uDon

the

occasion.

of.

er

tneir

Trisi*

Tne

Dresont

church

edifice on

Queen's Chapel

SilE

was

1807

and

1808

built

This

parish

thA

distinction

of

has

ownine

four

Amerinan

"Vinigar

or

the

Bible.

from

The

tale

Louisburk.

brougnt

DV

Sir

repperal

ano

was

of the l00

ball

It was recast by Paul

Rever

in 1806.

Its

organ

RISO

an anuque.

Of was built

In

b.ng

land

11

1710.

orismoutn records

a 50

daim

unat

Fresident

W

asA-

insten

worshined

at

the

orth

Church

Generai

Market square

wham

sitting

In

The

Whipple'

Dew.

church

was

the

acene

Party!

Decem

1773,

in

protest

tO

the

MaY

Governor

dohn Langdon

president of the

Sonate

and

Dane!

are

a co

listed

the notable dew

holders.

ST.

GEORGE'S

CHURCH, FRED-

ERICKSBURG, VA

This church

Washington's

was close to George

neart

nis

ThIe

througnout

bis father

Was

man

here

From

vestry-

famlly

the

took un

time

the

farm

their home at

che

on

the

enure

Rappahannock,

family

ine

St.

altended services at

Georges.

are

the

the

churchyard

graves or manv

relativag

and

family

old friends of the Washington

Fattion.

alone them

Col

MES

Martha

band.

Washington's

Colonel Fielding Lewis, his

brother-in-lak,

BRUTON PARISH CHURCH, WILLIAMSBURG,

VA.

The present structure erected in 1710-15 was not the first building

on

the

site.

The parish

dates back to 1633 and the. first

house ol

worshun was

a wooden building

In the first brick church, 1674-83, it

was ordered that "ve

men sit on the north side of ve church

and ye

women on the left'

The bell in the tower wag

"KIve

church

in 1761

and called the

Revolutionary

patriots. together.

After Col.

Washington

married Mrs. Custis he frequently attended Bruton Church

during the three months of his honeymoon

spent at her home, the White

House on the Paumnkey and while attending the sessions of the House

of Burgesses for sixteen vears, when they came to

Willlamsburg and

made their abode in her six chimneyed house in the town.

the day made his way to a Congre-

gational house of worship.

He did

this at Portsmouth, N. H., and also

at Litchfield.

To Wetherfield, he

was accompanied in state by

the

Governor.

Church going was also part or

his program during his famous

Southern tour in the summer of

1791. His diary carrled many nota-

tons of churches observed and vis.

Ited as well as the factories, schools

and all industries, of each place on

his itinerary. The principal church-

es which have found a

definite

mention in his oun record of at-

tending Divine service on this re-

markable Journey of 1,887 miles,

made in his biz cumbersome state

coach were, St. Philip's and St.

Michael's at Charleston, S. C., and

Christ Church in Savannah.

Undoubtedly

there'

are

other

churches than these listed which

proudly calm the honor of a visit

from the Father of His Country,

and whose names should be added

to any list of churches associated

ever so slightly with his presence,

but because his religtous views and

professions were so

wholly

per-

sonal and individual matter with

General Washington, the records of

his church going are disappointing-

ly meager.

BRUTON PARISH CHURCH VIEWED FROM THE WEST

PETER'S

CHUrCH

This

pleted

old

in

landmark

TaS

ao-

1461

While

General

lashinston

Tras

president,

he

and

Me. Washington attended services

this

church

frequently

auring

{he

winter

-82 when tnev

cuDied

the

dem

MI

samuel

Powell.

Mavor

Of

Philadelphia

"This

church Is located at 3rd and

Pine

trpetE

TRINITY CHURCH IN BOSTON

teneral

and

Mre.

Washington

frequently

attended

Trinity

Church

while

living

the

cralcie House,

th0

military

aquarter

• HA -

frequently

attended

the

Episcopal

Church

mornine

serlice and

h1s

10

the

ongregational Meeting House for

afternoon

or

worship.

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, BROAD CREEK, MARYLAND

Across the River trom near Mount Vernon

Another

very old church where it is calmed George Washington

attender

at

various

St.

John'

Board

Creek.

Maryland

About our mlles below Alexandria

on

broad

Creek

barge

schooners

once

Maryland

their

igt1e

bay

of

anchor

and

were loaded witn tobacco and otner products

• for

-foreien norts

More

200

vearE

the arst setters

The

dal

an boiscopal, Church

WAS

organlzed

by

narish

was called Fiscalawar.

atervardsKin

George

and the Church St.

John's

The fret little temple or Jogs-tai

but in IbJ..

In

In. 1763 it was enlarsed.

church

anledatesa..

other

Episcopal Churches

+16

Potomab

region

or marvan

 

PAGE 6. SEC. A

Many Important Parts

Played by Women in the

American Revolution

(Continued from Page 3, Sec.

alyzed and it is not too much to

state that had the women all over

the colonies not put thelr shoulder

to the wheel, the army would have

collapsed.

Men

can

not march

without food or without clothing,

and it's hard to march to, victory

without a flag

-It is seldom re-

membered, that Congress did

not

supply a single flag during the war

and few uniforms.

Long before General Washington

asked his offlcers to supply their

own flags-which was all he could

do-patriotic women all over the

country put

aside their samplers

and quilting and made flags, even

before they made army shirts and

bandages.

Flags for their sweet-

hearts, flags for their sons,

flags

for their State heroes! From silken

banners to flags of torn red flan-

les and

homesoun

sheets, they

raised the banners of their coun-

try.

One of the first centers of flag

making, when the struggle was be-

ed

SIn

having some

• fortifications

bullt on the outskirts of Phlla-

delphla and raised some volunteers

to man it.

In the Carolinas, flags

of beautiful workmanship and ma-

terials were

among

the earllest.

The Moultrie Flag, of blue, with &

white crescent, was made to match

the uniform of Moultrie's men, pre-

sented by

Mrs.

Elllott,

a well-

known heroine, and the Gadsden

Flag, the Rattlesnake on the yel-

low ground, 1s well known.

Philadelphia was the heart of the

nation, and there many good works

were done.

The ladles of this clty

united their efforts to supply the

soldiers with clothing, and Esther

Reed, the wife of the patriot, Joseph

Reed, was chosen unanimously

as

the head of the Assoclation and is

called "the best patriot, the most

zealous and actlve and the most at-

tached to the Interests of her coun-

try."

The work was the genulne

outpouring of the heart rend needed

no stimulation of bazaars or other

devices,

'Assoclated with Mrs. Reed, and

"In charge of the work after the

early death of that lovely and re-

markable woman, was Sarah Bache,

the only daughter of the great pa-

tlot,

Benjamin

Fanklin.

Mrs.

Bache was much like her father.

In every house the good work went

on.

The ladles bought the mate-

Ilals

from thelr own purses, and

cut and sewed all day long.

The

undertaking wRa also to collect all

the money possibe to buy shoes and

unforms and for the general relief

Ol

the terrible state

or destitution

that prevalled In the army.

Iwo

thousand shirts would be cut at one

time and distributed, and the knit-

ting

of socks was never

ending.

Deborah Sampson Presenting the Letter to General Washington

As for the money, all gave, largesse

of the rich and the widow's mite

were allke offerings from the heart.

Trinkets and

valued

jewels and

keepsakes were sacrificed willing-

ly.

The lovable consort.

-of

La-

fayette sent five hundred in specie

and the Countess of Luzerne con-

tributed six thousand in Continen-

tal paper, and old Mauma

Phillis

brought in her savings

of seven

shillings and sixpence.

Owing to this Association, head-

ed and ably managed by the ex-

ertions of

Sarah Bache,

&

large

part of the American Army was

provided with clothing.

This great

daughter of Franklin showed the

greatest patrlotism, and the most

unending perseverance and courage

in

this arduous undertaking, and

her name will never be for forgot-

ten in all the annals of war.

The Instances of remarkable he-

rolsm •on the part of women dur-

Ing the Revolution, are so numer-

ous that volumes could be filled

and yet the favorlte one of some

reader

omitted. Deeds of

great

bravery,

quick wit that contrived

escapes and sometimes saved an en-

tire settlement, were not few or

far between,

Such herolsm as made

the lives of their mothers glorious

was also shown by the very young.

One of

these

WaS Mary Anna

Glbbes, the thirteen-year-old daugh-

ter of Robert Gibbes, a South Caro-

Ina patrlot.

Their beautiful home

waS

surrounded by the Red Coats

and shots were falling all around as

the famlly escaped and took refuge

in

a cabin, a mile away, only to

discover that a small child had

been left behind on the third floor

of the mansion. Little Mary Anna

old not wat or a slave to be sent.

but like a flash was gone among

the

falling bullets and right through

LOe

soldiers

of both

3108

In

the

darkness of midnight.

The infant

She saved was John Fenwick, small

enough

for her

to

carry in her

arms, all that long mile, and who

grew to be General Fenwick and

did his part in the War of 1812.

The Gibbes mansion was saved by

the Americans,

whose

soon nad

mingled with those of the Britlsh,

unknown to little Mary Anna.

Another

young heroine,

Emily

Gelger, whose home 1s still stand-

ing near Columbla, South Carolina,

and inhabited by her descendants,

who have never mended the bul-

let

holes under the eaves.

During

General Greene's campaign in Caro-

Ina, it became

necessary

to send

message to

General

Sumter.

Greene

wishing

to joln forces in

order

to

ensure success

for

an

attack

on the British force.

The

situation

WaS

rather

desperate,

many miles of country full of blood-

thirsty Torles, and no man was will-

ing to undertake so dangerous

mission.

General Greene was about

to forego the undertaking when a

young girl reached his headquar-

ters

and proposed to be his mes-

senger.

He told her In detail the

contents of the written message, in

the

event

that anything should

happen.

Something, and quite

terrible something did happen, but

this young patriot was equal to the

occasion.

After two days of rid-

ing through the war-torn country,

keeping as much under cover as

possible, young Emlly was stopped

by Lord Rawdon's scouts. Coming

from the direction

of General

Greene's army, and unable to tell

an untruth without blushing,

she

was detained for search as a

spy.

The Tory old woman who did the

searching, however, could find no

evidence,

search

long as she

pleased, for Emlly had eaten

the

message up, every acrop of the pa-

per.

ink and all,

whlle

the matron

wan fumbling with her buttons and

they told

the Tou

women to

ride

unt

were no

sate for such

AS

Ishe, so Emily had to do a lot of

circultous riding before she dared

approach Genezal Greene's camp.

VIRGINIA SOUVI

Her family tell of how she was

afterwards taken from her home

and well beaten by, solders in re-

venge.

The story

of

Moll

PItcher 1s

known to all, but ever an incentive

to patriotism.

The decisive battle

of Monmouth was fought on a ter-

ribly hot summer day.

The wives

of the men trled to be near the

camps whenever they could, bring-

ing

food and

clothes,

and Molly

Hays was as close as she could go

to her husband, one of the Ameri-

can gunners.

Thls falthful

wife

saw

the

gunners were almost ex-

hausted by the heat, so she began

to bring water to them, and kept it

up all that terrible day.

Then,

suddenly, she saw her husband fall.

With a wild cry, she dropped her

pitcher, and bent over hls lifeless

form for

few moments,

then

seizing the ramrod from his hands,

she loaded and fired his cannon

till the battle was over. The next

day

General Washington sent

for

Molly Hays and the appreciative

Commander-in-Chief made

her

Sergeant in the Continental Army

while the

soldiers

cheered their

comrade, Moll Pitcher, forever after.

There were women in the active

service,

too, mainly because they

wanted to be in the thick of the

flght ,or felt they could not bear

the separation from a loved

one

not realizing

they

could perform

more valuable service

at home

rasing men for thelr country, and

raising food for the army,

spin-

ning

and weaving,

and making

clothes, yes, and sending them let-

ters and cheer

from home.

All

glory to those who chose the man's

part and reformed the active ser-

vice-the number of such women

will never be known

One such brave and herole sol-

dier was Margaret

Corbin.

The

resolution of Congress is on record

in this case, of July 17, 1779, in

which she is given honorable men-

tion.

"Resolved--That Margaret

Corbin, wounded and disabled

the attack

on

Fort Washington,

while she heroically filled the post

of her husband, who was killed by

her side serving a plece of artil-

lery, do receive, during her natural

llfe,

or continuance

of

sale ds-

abllity, one-half of the monthly pay

drawn by a solder in service of

these States; and that she now re-

celve out of public stores, one sult

of clothes,

or

value thereof, In

money."

Another Instance of purest pa-

triotism,

was that of

Deborah

Sampson, who served

under the

name of

Robert Shirtlffe.

The

same zeal that caused men to en-

list when the sound of a gun was

heard, the Impulse

tO

offer her

life for the protectlon of her coun-

try.

animated this young

woman.

A poor girl, alone in the

word ano

bound out by the State for her keep

throbbed with dellabt at

•Bne

vaca

uscussed

for

tae

reller or

the suerlos army

DONN

In some marvelous way she gained

enough knowledge to teach school

After her apprenticeship.

wAS over,

 

ENIR EDITION

and saved twelve dollars from her

salary in the summer term.

With this she bought a quantity

of coarse fustian, and secretly made

a suit of men's clothes, hiding each

piece in-a stack of hay as it was

finished.

Then

one

night, this

lonely and independent soul walked

to the near forest and changed into

her

disguise,

obtaining a

"boyish

Ilgure" by means of bandages. She

made a tall and handsome lad it

is sald.

Making her way to

the

American Army, she enlisted for the

whole term of the War, under the

name of Robert Shirtliffe. She was

one of the first volunteers in the

company of Captain Nathan Thayer

of Medway, Massachusetts, and as

the young recrult gave no connec-

tons, the Captain gave her a home

in his own family until his com-

pany joined the main army.

She

was a brave soldier, and was able

to keep her secret even when se-

verely wounded, and when women

had to fall in love with her! But

alas, In the course of a long at-

tack of brain fever, her case not re-

celving much attention as it was re-

garded as hopeless, her secret was

1ed

ool

er,

Rebecca Motte

learned.

In the end, after "poor

Bob"

had

barely

escaped being

burled allye, she was nursed back

to health and sent to deliver a let-

ter to

General

Washlngton.

He

saw she was trembling and ordered

refreshments and bade her retire

with an attendant, while he read

the letter.

The wise and consid-

erate

Washington

placed in her

hands her discharge from the ser-

vice, a sum of money to defray her

expenses, and a note contalning

few words of advice.

After

the

war was over, and Washington was

President, a letter came for Rob-

ert Shirtliffe Inviting her to visit

the seat of Government, and a bill

wes passed In

Congress granting

her a pension and certain lands,

walcos as 48

Her

due

her

services

Sater

marled

BoG

the

O?

Danon,

Molly

Major-General John Stark, farrled

O.

her

war

work,

When John

Stark heard that a shot had been

fired, he was off on his horse rals-

Ing his troops personally as he rode

along.

He left Molly

to till the

flelds, and she must have done it

successfuly, for when Congress did

not have the money to pay, John

Stark could and did do it himself.

His wife followed him to Benning-

ton, where he had gone on a battle

of his own choosing and contrary

to orders.

This brave woman could

see that supplies went along, and

the boys were to have refreshments

at the Stark

homes,

which were

scattered around that part of the

country.

When

Bunker Hill was

fought, Molly had her directions-

"Keep on horseback and keep rid-

ing in the neighborhood,

and 11

you see the enemy, let me know,"

all the days the fortifications were

being made.

And when the Gen-

eral was too far away for her to

help, she had plenty of sheep

10

shear and plenty of quilts to make

and grist to grind, and her heart

was full of love for her soldler boys,

aS

well as for the eleven children

she was raising to honor and pro-

tect their country,

All over

the

land there were

women like Molly Stark, women of

comfort and means, with husbands

high in the service, all of which

they regarded as thelr greater in-

centive and

privilege

for never-

ceasing war work and many who

lived more humbly. No work too

arduous, no sacrifice too great, no

patriotism too lofty.

In the citles

occupied by the British, the daring

of these patriots was never

equal-

led.

While outwardly submitting,

they made the British admire their

unylelding patriotism.

The intelli-

gent forecast, the presence of mind

and great fortitude in the

most

painful situation, the herotc speech

and conduct, proved them worthy of

their brave men.

Of this lofty character was Re-

becca Motte, one of the great hero-

ines of South Carolina.

At the

time that the British were in gar-

risOn

at

Ft.

Motte, Mrs. Motte,

whose

plantation

mansion

wAS

within a few yards, was of course

requested to move out, so the Brit-

ish officers could move in.

It hap.

pened that she picked up a quiver

full of arrows as she went out the

door, and when the British officer

questioned

her

act,

she

coolly

touched the arrow's tip to his fin-

ger, saying It was polsoned, and

walked on to a little cottage near-

by.

Now American forces appeared

and the only way to drive the gar-

rison from the Fort was by firing

the roof of the

Motte mansion,

which was of shingles that would

easily burn. Rebecca Motte her self

prepared the arrow which she

so

fortunately had, and to which balls

of blazing rosin and brimstone

were

attache.

The roof blazed and the

Dificers

soon

obliged

to snOw

the atas

rons

men.

oL

patriotio lady

lavited

Inhem te

and herself presided with unaffect-

ed politeness.

The grace and true

humanity of such women, and there

were many,

dld much to secure

privileges and courteous treatment

later on.

When Rebecca Motte saw that

Charleston, her clty and where she

had a beautiful home, was to be

attacked, she sent to her plantation

for all her slares and turned them

over to help in erecting defenses,

providing their rations and clothing

herself.

Her beautiful home, still

one of Charleston's famous houses

and still adorned with the brocades

and other treasures it had before

the Revolution, was chosen as head-

quarters for the British officers.

Rebecca Motte decided she would

not be driven from her home by Sir

Henry Clinton or any of his officers,

and perhaps she used a little tact,

for it is

also recorded that Sir

Henry Clinton requested her to stay

and make a home for his staff and

himself. The requests of a con-

queror are virtual commands, and

Mrs. Motte was greatly relleved as

this enabled

her to

protect her

house.

The British

treated

her

with perfect courtesy and spoke of

themselves as her guests. Lord Raw-

don succeeded

Clinton

as

chief

"guest,"

and when later on, Re-

becca Motte wished to go to her

country home, Lord Rawdon gave

his permission, making the

com-

ment that he "regretted he had not

been permitted

TO

make the

2C.

quaintance of her

famlly!"

and

thanking her with the most scrupu-

lous pollteness for her hospitality,

Rebecca Motte had all that long

and weary

time,

kept her three

pretty daughters

up

In the attic,

attended by a faithful black Mammy

and they had not been seen, nor

seen, a single

one

of

the thirty

British officers occupying the house!

The situation was a hard one-for

all concerned!

When

all

this

was happening

THE ALEXANDRIA GAZETTE

down in the South, there was like

herolnes in the North.

Catherine

Schuyler, the wife of General Phll-

p Schuyler, who was at Albany In

safe quarters from the advancing

British forces under Burgoyne, knew

that her elegant-country-seat near

Saratogn would be right In Bur-

goyne's way. She dared to go right

in the path of the advancing troops,

to try to save the famlly treasures,

She was the only daughter of John

Van

Rensselaer,

the

Patroon of

Greenbush, and had a right to pa-

triotism, bravery, and also treasure

of material kind.

And while on

this errand, she did a little real

war work by taking torches and her-

self setting fire to her own vast

fields of ripening wheat, and mak-

ing her neighbors do the same,

thus destroying the supples the

British army

was counting

on.

Mrs.

Schuyler's daughter became

the wife

of

Alexander Hamilton,

and, like her mother, was a woman

of great Influence and patriotism.

She had

the

leadershlp of her

mother in war work, as the mar-

rage to Colonel Hamilton did not

take place until 1780, the year be-

fore the surrender of Cornwallis, at

which time Colonel Hamllton was

on the staff of George Washing-

ton.

The Hamilton-Schuyler wed-

ding was one of the few for which

the Liberty Bell pealed forth the

announcement.

It sometimes happens that great

men do not select great women for

their wives, but this does not seem

to have been the way of the great

Revolutionary

characters.

Well-

read and deep-thinking John Adams

wrote, however,

in

one of those

epistle-letters

of his to his

oWn

wonderful wife, and speaking of the

two British commanders:

"I be.

(Turn to Page 7, Col. 1, Sec. A)

WASHINGTON

BI•CENTENNIAL

We sing praises of the man whose principles of

government were conceived with such vision that

they survive today to serve a nation of more than a

hundred million people.

LINDSEY-NICHOLSON CORP.

110 King Street

Telephone 67

Distributors- for

TIRE

STEWART WARNER RADiOS

 

 

 

ALEXANDRIA€

VIRGINIA

where history, commerce

and industry meet

During the year 1932 you are cordially invited

to visit the many points of historic interest in Alex-

andria, Virginia, George Washington's home town.

The office of the Alexandria Chamber of Com-

merce is open to everybody, and it shall be our pleas-

ure to serve visitors to the best of our ability.

Alexandria

Chamber of Commerce

Inc.

FRANK W. NoxON, President

1732

1932

This firm is proud of being one of

the old

established concerns in George

Washington's home town and joins with

Alexandria in paying

homage to him

throughout this bicentennial year.

W. A. Smoot and Company, Inc.

COAL

LUMBER

MILLWORK

Since 1865

 

 

 

THE ALEXANDRIA GAZETTE

Many Important Parts

Played by Women in the

American Revolution

(Continued from Page 6, Sec. A)

lieve the two Howes have not very

great women for wives *

a smart

wife would have put Howe in pos-

session of Philadelphia long ago!"

Abigail Adams,

the beloved and

devoted wife of John Adams, is one

of the best known figures of the

Revolution.

She

was not only

very brilliant woman, but a wife

who was a comrade and a partner

With carefulness and serenity she

took over her husband's business,

exchanging letters with him every

day, this correspondence being a

boon to historians and a delight to

readers of all literature.

In the

midst of the din of battle, in ter.

rible anxiety

for

her

husband's

safety, with pestilence raging in her

household,

and herself a victim,

Abigail Adams writes:

"I am dis-

tressed but not dismayed.

I have

been able to maintain a calmness

and presence of mind, and I hope

I shall continue to do so, no mat-

ter

what the exigency of the

times.

Mrs. John Jay, another of the

Revolution's wonderful women, was

of great assistance to her husband

and country.

As the wife of Johu Hancock, one

of Massachusetts' very greatest pa-

triots. Dorothy Hancock had an im-

portant

part

to

play.

She had

only been married to him a brief

year or a little less, when the Brit-

ish made their attack at Lexington

and

Concord.

She was with her

husband when Paul Revere came to

warn him and it was with diffi-

culty that they escaped and reached

Woburn. Madame Hancock was an

ardent supporter

of

all her hus-

band's undertakings. Her forte lay

not so much in knitting socks or

visiting the sick, but in harmonizing

the varying factlons and supplying

the

social element in Boston,

a-

ways vastly conducive to the break-

Ing down

of

Inhibitions and the

molding of opinions and the circu-

lation

of news as to all that was

Mrs.

John Jay

afoot in Boston.

Madame Hancock

could make the breakfast table talk

vastly informative to John Hancock,

for

all classes of society thronged

her house.

The wife of Major-General Knox,

Lucia,

who parted with her

Tory

family when she married this pa-

triot, to whom General Washington

waS

always

most

attached,

was

almost as much a soldier as her

husband . She joined the American

Army at Cambridge, and from that

time

on led a relitary life, except

that she did not go on the battle-

fields. Her courage and endurance

never failed. When Boston was oc•

cupied by the British. she escaped,

and

carrled her

husband's sword

quilted within the lining

of her

cloak.

She followed the army and

it was conceded that her cheerful

spirit

did much to

enliven the

dreary. scenes.

The soldiers could

not murmur at hardships which

Madam

Knox

endured

without

complaint. General Knox frequent-

ly asked her opinion on military

moves

and It is said that her In-

fluence and good judgment were

admitted by

Washington himself.

The soldiers knew she was just as

gond a man as any of them. and

a tower of strength in many ways.

Her hospitality and her pocket-book

had no limit,

The name of Mercy

Warren,

the

brilliant patriot, and

the

sister of

James Otis, is not so well known,

but she exercised as

great influ-

ence during the great struggle a3

any

cne single person.

Of singli-

larly gifted mentality,

and great

depth of feeling, she espoused the

cause of the Revolution and it be-

came the great Interest of her life

She possessed acute political wis-

dom, ard although a resident of

Flymouth

and

scarcev evar

Philadelphia,

at

the

leaders

of the

Revolution were nearly all in cor-

respondence with her,

asking her

opinion on this and that and ac-

judgment. Both Samuel and John

Adams, Jefferson, Dickinson, Gerry,

Knox and other consulted her on

important issues. Her letters

are

masterpieces of discretion.

In re-

ply to a letter from John Adams

that he should be glad to hear from

her "on a certain sunject," she dis-

claims the wisdom to reply and then

speaks of a period in Grecian his-

tory when a ambitious man has

been chosen.

"I advise you,"

sop

writes.

"to beware of choosing an

ambitious Philip for, your leader

* such a one might build up a

Menarchy on the ruins of the hap-

py institution.'

It was just after

this that John

Adams proposed

Washington as the Commande-in-

Chlef.

They all went to see her-

the General and Lady Washington,

Lafayette, Hamilton, Abby Adams

and if they can't see her, they write

and she answers.

Mercy Warren

was a real power behind the scenes

Another

great figure in these

days

was

Martha

Wilson, the

daughter of Colonel Stewart, one

Washington's staff officers in 177€.

She was a bride at seventeen and

a war

widow at twenty.

Robert

Wilson, her young soldier hustand.

had followed Washington from the

day

the great

General

passed

through Philadelphia on his way

o Cambridge to take charge of the

Revolution.

Martha Wilson

was

often

qr.

Philadelphia,

that

when there were affairs to attend

to

but her residence and her war

work, was in northern New Jersey

at her father's great establishment,

over which she had presided with

grace and dignity, since the

early

age

of thirteen; and at her own

establishment at Hackettstown. She

was the intimate friend and asso-

ciate, and entertained at her house

George Washington, Lafayette, Ham-

ilton. Wayne, Greene, Gates, Max-

well, Lincoln, Henry Lee, Stevers,

Ethan Allen,

Pulaski,

and John

Paul Jones.

The visits of Ameri-

can Army!

The visits of General

and Mrs. Washington, accompanier

DV

the full staff, sometimes lasted

for two days, and were oasis

rest

for

of

thesc hard-driven men.

Little strategems were employed by

Martha Wilson, for patriotic pur-

poses, that the country-side might

"Abigall"

VIRGINIA SOUVI

Protrait of Martha Washington in

Old

Age

see the General,

"the august and

commanding presence of the father

his

country,"

she

remarks,

* having alone inspired such

profound veneration for

the man

as to produce an abiding respect

for the

of which he was

leader."

Lady Washington distin-

guished Martha Wilson by marked

courtesies always, stopping over at

her house to and from camp,

aC-

cording to Mrs. Ellet's invaluable

research.

It was not alone for friends and

acqualntances and persons of rank

that Mrs. Wilson kept open house

during the Revolution.

From the

very beginning to the close of war,

she was the soidlers' friend. Those

in

distress in any department

of

life, and most especially the sick,

were sought out by her, and if pos-

sible,

brought

to

her dwelling.

While raising her

only

child,

daughter, she

took

the part

of

mother to other children bereaved

by the war. In short, this wealthy

and beautiful woman, who had been

the ornament

of

the great ball

given to celebrate the passage of

the

Declaration,

on

the frigate

"Washington"

at

anchor in the

 

 

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GREETINGS!

The associated Banks of the City of Alexandria, Virginia, join in extending

cordial greetings and hearty welcome to those who, with us, celebrate the birthday

of George Washington.

Every true American should bow with reverence to the name and memory of

Washington, whose life and works were devoted to the cause of human liberty,

and the foundation of our great Republic.

Alexandria National Bank

Citizens National Bank

Burke and Herbert, Bankers

First National Bank

 

 

 

TELLING THE COUNTRY

about

OUR STATE

Visit VIRGINIA in 1932/

Beautiful Virginia, Mother of Presidents, invites

you to be her guest in 1932.

Come see our

prosperous State, our farms, our schools, our

factories. As one of Virginia's progressive organi-

zations, we welcome you.

write

us for

any information vol

may want about the Oid Dominio

Main Natioual and State Highways

PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY

Newport News

Alexandria

Charlottesville

VIRGINIA

South Boston

ABOVE

Is reproduced one of the

recent advertisements.o

the vir.

Such a risit will do more than mere

Clifton Forge

words could erer

accomplish I will

rinia l'ublic Serrice Compans.

Eire each and every visitor a new nie

peared in tha

Riceniennin

ture of the men who helped make tal

when an

a nation-wide circulation.

country posalbla

hen them

realize the foresight, the latesrito

We sincerely hope that this ndrer

and the Industry af our forefathers

Elsement will do Its share In bringing

people from all over the United States

Looking with (her own eves upon

our stardr hills and

fertlle.

Tallne

10 rilE the ben

utiful State of Virginla

they will learn lo

during 1933. We hope Cher will come

Stale eren a

9 we do,

or the hundreds, with their sons and

Affer meeting and talking with our

daughters, and see

for Themsolves lho

Virzinia Belaabore,

Thee will return

birtholaces and homes af our Preal:

hone wilh renewed rallh

An ponte

dence In the dealins of America.

VIRGINIA PUBLIC SERVICE CO.

 

 

 

TRY ALEXANDRIA GAZETTE

Painters and Paintings of George Washington

Portraits Are

Widely

Different in Conception

Iwenty-seven Artists Paint Two Hundred and Fifty Pictures from

Life; Houdon Bust Selected by Committee as Best Portrayal

By M. E. GILFOND

I INTIL last spring a seeminaly

perpetual question among art-

1sts,

crtics and historians was:

which of the numerous pantings of

George Washington, executed by his

contemporaries and painted from

life, bears the closest resemblance

to the man himself?

This question was answered last

year by the speclal Portrait Com-

mittee of the United States George

Washington Bicentennial Commis-

sion.

This Committee, made up of

some of the leading authorities in

the United States,

answered the

question by selecting not a

George

Washington portrait but the Hou-

don Bust, the original of which

may still be viewed at Mount Ver-

non, as the best and most lifelike

resemblance of the Father of His

Country

photograph

of

this famous

Portrait of George Washlngton by Edward Savage.

picture now in the possession of Harvard College.

From the original

This picture is con-

sidered one of the best of the George Washlngton portraits in exist-

ence,

weeks. He made a cast of the face * personally commissioned him

to

and took meticulous measurements

paint the

pictures

of

both Mrs.

of the body,

Returning to France,

Washington and himself. This pic-

he finished the statue in 1788. It

ture

of

the

General

satisfied

remained In France until the new

Stuart, so much so that he hated

Capitol at Richmond was

fin-

to part with It.

He purposely left

ished.

the background unfinished so that

The statue was finally placed in

he could make copies before pre-

Richmond on May 14, 1796, where

senting the original to the sitter,

it still remains. This statue is life-

Washington,

somewhat impatient,

size, measuring 6 feet, 2 inches in

informed Stuart that he would ac-

height. It is made of Italian mar-

cept a copy rather than wait

50

ble and plotures Washington in the

long for the completion

Od

the

military dress

of

the Revolution.

original.

So the original treasure

The original bust from which the

remained with Stuart and upon hls

official photograph was taken, is at

death, on July 27, 1828, it came into

Mount Vernon.

the possession of his wife.

Houdon died in Paris in 1828 at

In October, 1831, this picture was

the ripe old age of 87.

His bust,

sold by his widow for $1,500 to the

always regarded as one of the best

Washington Association of Boston

likeness

ever

re-produced

of

and was in turn presented to the

George Washington, Is now recog-

Boston Athenaeum,

which soclety

nized throughout the world.

still owns it.

This is the picture

which is known throughout the

Before the selection of the Hou-

don bust by the Portrait Committee

world as the "Athenaeum Portratt"

of George Washington.

It can be

sald that this portrait, which adorns

the dollar bill, has always been the

best known and most popular palnt-

ing of George Washington.

Congressman Sol Bloom, Associate

Director

of

the

United

States

George

Washington

Bicentennial

Commission, belleving that one

the best ways of making our First

President better known to the popu-

lace was by widely circulating his

picture, distributed a million copies

of this photograph to every nook

and cranny of the United States.

The first painting

of

George

Washington was made in 1772 by

Charles Willson Peale.

The older

Peale is one of the most colorful of

all Colonial artists.

Peale was born

in Chestertown, Maryland, on April

15, 1741.

As a boy he was appren-

ticed

to

saddler.

When

che

reached 21 years of age, he went

into business for himself, combin-

ing with "saddling," coach making,

clock and watch making, silver-

smithing and dentistry.

Soon he

gave up the whole repertoire

for

painting.

Peale visited the renowned Copley

in Boston and in the summer of

1768 he arrived in London,

where

he studled with Benjamin West, the

generous American painter, for the

next

year.

Upon

his return

to

America In June of 1770, he settled

in Maryland, executing portraits in

Annapolis and Baltimore.

Soon Peale achieved a reputation

which, at any rate, reached as far

as Mount Vernon.

For In May of

1772,

we

find Peale at Washing-

bust,

became the official George

Washington picture.

 

It 1s Interesting and instructive

to turn back the pages of Amerl-

can history to see some of the fa-

mous pictures of George Washing-

ton and to learn something about

the artists who painted them.

George

Washington

sacrificed

much of his time sitting for paint-

ers. He seemed to be a magnet and

attracted artists from all corners of

the world anxious to paint his pic-

ture.

It can safely be sald that

there have been painted some 250

portraits of Washington

- taken

from life and coples made by the

original

painters.

Twenty-seven

artists worked on this subject.

In the elghteenth century, pho-

tography was an unknown art.

Cann

artist had to produce quantity as

well as quality.

If a man made a

good picture of a distinguished per-

son, requests were made for like-

nesses or copies from that person's

friends.

The rates varied with the

eminence of the artist. For in those

days, portraiture

combined

the

commercial with the artistic.

It 15

alleged that Rembrandt Peale made

xIO

coples of his father's, Charles

Willson Peale, pictures, and 79 of

his own.

Painting

was in its infancy

in

Washington's time.

The two best

known American artists were John

Singleton

Copley

of

Boston and

Benjamin

West,

transplanted

American, living in London.

While

neither of these artists ever painted

America's hero, their influence on

Washington's

portraits is in

evi-

dence.

Practically all the Ameri-

can artists who made paintings of

George

Washington studied

with

either Copley or West or with both.

Since the Houdon Bust has been

selected

as

the

official

George

Washington

Picture, It might

be

advisable

to take up this famous

piece of art first.

80

remarkable is the

bust of

Washington, sculptured by the fa-

mous

Frenchman,

Jean

Antoine

Houdon, that it has been copied by

palnters and

sculptors

alike for

more than a hundred years.

Made

late in life from direct sittings, and,

being in the round, Washington's

countenance is fully portrayed. Gil-

bert Stuart himself announced that

Houdon's bust was the best head

ever made of Washington, better

even than his own famous

"Athe-

naeum Portrait" which 1s known all

over the world.

In 1784 the General Assembly of

Virginia passed the following reso-

lution:

"That the Executive

be

requested to take measures for pro-

curing a statue of General Wash-

ington, to be made of the finest

marble

and

best

workmanship.

Governor Harrison

commissloned

Charles Willson Peale to make

full-length portralt of Washington

and to send It to Thomas Jeffer-

son, who

WaS

then

stationed at

Paris.

Jefferson had made

aI-

rangements with Houdon to. fashion

the statue from this picture, but

when the sculptor saw it he had

change of heart and declded to

come to the United States himself

to see his subject in the flesh.

Houdon

arrived

in

1785 and

stayed at Mount Vernon for two

Portrait of General George Washington

by Gilbert Stuart.

Photo-

graphed direct from the original portrait now in the Boston Museum of

Fine Arts.

(Unfinished Athenaeum).

of the United States George Wash-

ington

Bi-centennial Commission,

the painting of Washington con-

sidered best was the "Athenaeum

Portralt" executed by Gllbert Stuart

in 1796, only three years before the

General's death.

Stuart was born in Narragansett,

Rhode Island, on December 3, 1755.

He received his first instructions in

painting from Cosmo Alexander,

Scotchman living in America. When

Alexander was ready to return

tO

Edinburgh he took Stuart, then 18

years of age, with him.

Alexander

soon died and Stuart returned to

America, where he painted pictures

in Newport and Boston.

At the outbreak of the American

Revolution, Stuart moved to Lon-

don where, like so many

of his

American

contemporaries, he

re=

ceived kindly assistance and encour-

agement from Benjamin West. Soon

Stuart was doing very well in Lon-

don; but for several reasons, his de-

sire to paint a portrait of George

Washington belng one of them, he

agaln returned to America.

Stuart made three, now famous,

pictures

of

George

Washington.

The first was executed in Septem-

ber of 1795. This picture, however,

was not to Stuart's liking. It even-

tually found its way into the hands

of Samuel Vaughan of London and

has

since

been known

as

the

"Vaughan

Painting'

of

George

Washington.

On April 12, 1796, at the request

of the famous

American beauty,

Mrs.

Bingham, Washington again

consented to sit for Stuart.

This

picture, a full-length portralt, was

made for

the

Marquis of Lans-

downe, and has since been known

as the "Lansdowne Portrait."

The

artist, however, was still not satis-

field.

Stuart had his third opportunity

the same year when Washington

ton's home

working on a three-

quarter-length portrait of

George

Washington, dressed in the uniform

of a Colonel of the Virginia Mili-

tia. This picture has since become

famous as the "Virginia Colonel"

picture of George Washington.

At the outbreak of the Revolu-

tionary War, Charles Wilson Peale

joined the American Army as

Captain of Volunteers.

During the

war his easel was as important as

his rifle, for he executed many pic-

tures between battles.

In the sum-

mer of 1776 he did a miniature of

the General for Mrs.

Washington;

in

1778 he started a portrait at

Valley

Forge

which

was finally

completed at Philadelphia; in 1778

he did another minlature, this one

for Lafayette;

and in 1778-79 he

painted a full length portrait of the

General for the State of Pennsyl-

vania.

Peale painted his last pic-

ture of Washington in 1795, which

portrait now hangs in the gallery

of the New

York Historical So-

ciety.

This prolific artist died in Phila-

delphia on February 22, 1827, hav-

ing painted more pictures, from life,

of George Washington

than any

other artist.

The Peale family is famous in re-

lation

to

Washington's

portraits.

Not only did Charles Willson Peale

and his brother James work on the

subject,

but

also his

son, Rem.

brandt Peale. It is generally main-

tained that the son excelled both

the father

and the uncle as

an

artist.

Rembrandt Peale, the second son

of Charles Wilson Peale, was born

In Bucks County, Pennsylvania, in

1778. Naturally he grew up with

& great reverence for the General,

At

eight,

he stood

behind

father's chair

while Peale senior

was painting Washington.

That

Rembrandt Peale soon developed a

 

 

 

VIRGINIA SOUVENIR EDITION

n

r.

5

Houdon Bust of George Washington made from life at Mount Vernon by

the great French sculptor, Jean Antone Houdon, In 1785

controlling desire to paint his hero

himself, was only normal.

At the request of the elder Peale,

Washington consented to sit for the

son in September of 1725. So ner-

vous was Rembrandt--he was then

a mere boy-that his father

went

with him and painted a picture ol

the General at the same time. On

the other side of Rembrandt was

his uncle James who took advan-

tage of the situation to execute a

miniature.

This, unusual

experl-

ence of sitting for three artists at

one time led to the alleged remark

by

the sitter that he

was belng

"Peeled" from all sides.

While Rembrandt Peal's picture

gained some popularity-ten copies

were sold in Charleston alone--it

old not satisfy the artist.

Nor was

he satisfied with any other exist-

ing portraits of Washington.

That

Rembrandt Peale's taste was high-

er than the average 1s evldenced

by this remark: "I had made dur-

ing several years, sixteen of these

attempts and

tho' not equal

to

my own expectation, they all found

satisfled possessors.

In 1823, he finally

succeeded in

making a painting of Washington

o his own Ilking.

This pleture was

composite of his own paintings

id others.

So pleased

was

ne

Uh it that he took it to Europe

1 exhibited it in London, Parts,

Jen

Rome

and Florence,

He

e and sold many coples of this

1832 the orlainal yat

the City of New York.

That is the

picture which shows Washington in

full unform standing by

a white

horse.

In 1792 he also did a ple-

ture for the City of New Haven.

Later

Trumbull fitted these pic-

tures into historical settings. Such

pictures as "Surrender of Cornwal-

Ils,

and "Washington's Resigna-

tion

at Annapolis" are

very well

known.

Trumbull held the post of

President of the

Amercan

Acad-

emy

of Fine Arts from

1816.00

1825. He died in New York on No-

ember 10, 1843.

Another

interesting

portralt

palnter of

the, time

was Joseph

Wright.

He was born in Borden-

town, New Jersey, on July 16, 1756.

His father died when he was a boy

and his mother, who earned a live-

hood by making wax figures, took

him to London.

Wright recelved a

good education and also Instruc-

tons in painting

from

Benjamln

West.

In

1782 he was in

Paris

and in 1783 he arrived in Boston

with a letter of recommendation to

Washington from Benjamin Frank-

Before Wright left London he

had painted the Prince of Wales

which had "boosted his stock" con-

siderably.

In the fall of 1783 he palnted

Washington at his headquarters at

Rocky Hill, New Jersey.

In 1783-4

Wright made another

picture

of

Washington for the Count de Solms,

pald for by Washington,

Besides,

Washington Bicentennlal Commis- Painting Depicting

Wertmueller went back to Swe-

den but returned to the United

Baptism, Washington

States In 1800. He marled and set-

ted in Delaware,

where he lived

until his death whlch occurred on

Claimed That Rites Were Performed

by Rey. Jno. Gano, Chaplain

at Valley Forge

October 5, 1811.

Robert Edge Pine was born in

London in 1742 and came to the

United States to paint portralts of

the heroes of the American Revo-

lution,

His plan was later to in-

corporate these into historical set-

tings.

Unfortunately, death frus-

trated these plans.

The Hon.

Francis Hopkinson of

Philadelphia wrote to Washington

requesting a sitting for Pine.

It

was in answer to this request, that

Washington wrote his famous let-

ter on May 16, 1785:

"In for a penny, in for a pound,

Is an old adage.

I am so hack-

neyed to the touches of the paint-

er's pencil, that I am now alto-

gether at thelr beck, and sit like

patience on a monument; whilst

they are delineating the ilnes of

my face.

At first I was as restive

under the operation, as a colt is of

the saddle. The next time I sub.

mitted very reluctantly, but with

less

flouncing.

Now,

no

dray

moves more readlly to his thrill

than I do to the painter's char.'

Pine, however, was granted per-

mission to paint Washington's por-

trait.

He stayed at Mount Vernon

(From The Examiner, About

March 1, 1908)

A

N

oll

painting

representing

George Washington and one of

his chaplains, Rev. John Gano, was

recently painted by order of Rev.

E. T. Sanferd of the North Church,

Borough of Manhattan, New York.

Mr. Sanford, who is an enthusiastic

admirer

of

Washington, employed

German and French artists to paint

picture representing the baptism

of Washington in the Potomac River

by Chaplaln John Gano of Clinton's

New York Brigade during the Revo-

lutionary War.

He was pastor for

many years of the First Church of

New York City, From the time when

Washington, as a little boy, studied

his catachism

in

the

Episcopal

Church, until his

death, he had

great respect for ministers of the

gospel.

Chaplain Gano was one of

those friendly ministers whose

ligious council

was belleved

Washington. Gano, at the time the

British army entered New York City,

fled with his family

Warwick,

N.

, where a desk carried by hlm

sill remains in the home of C. V.

Sanford, as a souvenir of his army

life.

for three

weeks,

where,

besides

The fact that Gano offered the

painting the General, he also cild

the grand-children of Mrs. Wash-

Ington.

Pine

remalned

in

the

United States untll his death in

Philadelphla in 1788.

Edward Savage made a palnting

of Washington which continues to

this day to be very popular. Born

In

Princeton,

Massachusetts,

in

1761, his first calling was that of

a goldsmith.

Washington sat for

Savage, at the request of the Prest

dent and Governors of Harvard Col-

lege, in December of 1789 and the

early part of 1790,

This portralt was donated by the

arilst to Harvard College In 1792,

where it still remans. Later, Sav-

age went abrond and studied in

London and in Italy. He returned

to the United States and died in

his native State of Massachusetts

In 1817.

James

Sharples

waS

born

in

England and educated In France.

He came to America towards the

end of. the 18th century, where he

traveled through the land making

small-sized profiles of the leading

people of the day.

In Philadel-

phia, in 1706, Sharples made a pro-

file of Washington which has ever

since

recelved

much

favorable

criticism.

Many people regard It

as the best likeness ever executed.

The above mentiond are only the

better known George Washington

paintings made by contemporaries.

Since his death, thousands of re-

productions have been

made

by

painters and sculptors in all parta

the civilized world,

PAGE I, SEC. B

old soldiers to this fact in the Mie

of George Washington,

Mrs. Cobb's Arst husband was an

ancestor of the Hon. W. J. Bryan

and she was a daughter of Lieut.

Danlel Gano of the Revolutionary

Artillery service.

The fact of the

baptism of Washington is set forth

In a letter by Rev. R. M, Gano,

minister of the Christian church

who tells the story as follows:

"During the Revolutlonary War

my great grandfather, John Gano,

who was chaplain in the army and

a personal friend of General Wash-

ington,

Was

approached

by

the

General, who sald:

"I hare been

investigating

the scripture,

and

belleve Immersion

in

be baptism

taught in the Word of God, and :

demand It at your hands. I do not

wish any parade made, or the army

called out, but simply a quiet ad-

ministration of the ordinance,' and

Chaplain Gano took General Wash-

Ington down In the

stream and

Immersed him in the presence of

1orty-two witnesses.

"The

fact that there

WaS DO

joining

Baptist church by

Washington is apparent, for it was

the custom

Baptlst. churches

then, as It is now, to have personal

testimony at a church meeting of

those who desire to unite with the

church

DV

baptism

before

the

ordinance. This baptlsm by Gano of

General Washington was evidently

the larger use

of the Christian

ministry by John Gano to give the

great soldier an opportunity to obey

Peale,

Rembrandt-Composite picture made

from

Houdon bust and other contemporary portralts.

the Vice-President at the

Capitol.

own studies, from

Now in the room of

the Captaln of our Salvation, 

 

 

 

 

 

THE ALEXANDRIA GAZETTE

Washington' Triumphant Joumney

to New

York as President-elect

With Affectionate Farewell to Mt. Vernon and Alexandria He Be-

gins Notable Trip, Enthusiastically Greeted at

Every Town En Route

that formed

March 3. 1789. the death

the

old Confederation

sara

WAs

terminated in Philadelphia Septem-

aunounced by the runs of the lorl

iber 11, 1761,

and tor2

cvs later

opposite

oBowlin

Green

Neu

of the new Consabution

work

sneA

cav

Conunental

was ushered in Dy

le True

or a

gress holding sessions in

New York

ADDroVAl

The request

York

in commany wim no hom-

and Co

humoarevs.

with

the best disposition to render

vice to my country In obedlence

Its calls

but with less hope of

rauncason to the statee and

ecelved mne

aDDro

nine stairs

Concress shod

salute of 11 guns In honor of the

d adopted

Consumition

ADT

George Washington of Viralnia'

declared resident, having

received

ble total

er o votes cast

& later day when the electors should

Mast to vote for a Pres dent.

memhers

Constitutionn.

that they had a

ther

wANT

me sam

they had

belleving that the rauricaton

WOLO

not be

easily

accomplished.

But

o sone one

_been

- bur.s ascoyer

how uncompromising

maned to be fought out before

Present course elected

the

Continenta

concress when

to aer

Mally the Constitution as submuLted

Sauter

davs or hented argummr.

Groat

Dublia

evenIs

were

ranin

Charles Thom

Son.

Trisman Dy

sormn.

who haa

as secretar

Continental Congress 10r

years,

sepaind

George Washin

elon

tIdin

corer

uDon

him

days of

last trave

cervalo

Interestlor to know

the amount of time consumed

-LoS

lour

Trom

New York to

Mount Vernon.

secretary Thomson

New Xork Tuesday

morning

April 7, and

on the following Thurg-

dav

• ne was n

Friday morning he contir

-Dassine throwh

minaton the same dav.

Ba Sunday evenn.

aMOn

day, April 13. he left Baltimore and

Mount Vern

Tuesday afternoon

Te was more than

making

made in six nouIs

Alter the formal pre

Thomson

his certuicau

, Genera.

wasangton

replled

so emn.

convincin

manner.

President-elect

Washington

TuaR

met by his Ir ends and neighbors

an0

escorted into Alexandria, whel

was given an early dinner at

Mr. Wise's tavern. The toasts

lupre drunk

at this meal tola the

storv

orthe times:

"The King of

"The Federal

ton-may it be fairly tried":

Int

memory or those martyrs who fell

rion18

"America":

American manula

"American ladies, may their

win the soirit.

the government."

the conclusion of the dinner

the mayor or Alexandria addressed

General Washineton.

dIs con-

cluding remarks he sald.

"Go ana

brale.

people who will be doubly

they

contemplate this recent

sacrifice 10r

era

Wachino'on'e

u was volca to suomI

A er months

dater, In December

1787. Delaware.

and

NeTT

_Jerse?

ceorraand

Connecticut followed

Ater n

Juvelv

cusslon Massachusetts ratified.

resung amendments; Maryland and

South Carolne

conun

Droo.

and in

Nev Hampsare

the R

•onine mne ninin

fine in ratify

400

conditions necessary for starting the

dew GovE

country had dividad

two

309 008.

the federallsts and the

antl-Federalists

accorone

leaving benad many

"Tae

bind.

unis

neighbors

friends who fairlv adored

die belovor

homa

"Unutterable sensations

. "must be left to

wale tron

sol al. mv

Irlends and kind neighbors.

consider or

time some of the

Dou

Louses

Congress nave been

On the journey

TroM

to Georgetown General

WasAIlI

deed the DuDlc

d seems to be impre

doing

16 SOI

I can

at iberty in

approval or disapproval of the Con

the contest between

the factions in virgila

and ev

DOrk

-waS long and acute. It p

Isole O

delav mu

journey

readiness to ser out the

dav

tomorrow. and shall be

lends and neighbors and

children who in

this man

dald. tribute to

Meanwhile some of the most dis-

cluzens

teoroston

met. General

Washington

banks o

Potomac and acted as

lourne

tOWA!

Baltimore

At this juncture of the

the presidential party was

Judy, IL Y

Dermir

me to sav

pointed to welcome them to Mary.

or requremenys

these two treat States were

Is a pecullar gratication to

the firing or cannon

received tts communicatior

General wasnington was conaucuca

from you.

Into line wil

of spectators to

before leaving

Ver

Grant's Tavern.

other states before

the machinery

non the President

elect wrote in a

address of welcome

ras put Into operation for the first

410

the folowing

Ores.

IVeT

Yor

accoraco

"I bade adieu to Mount Vernon

sunDer was served in lip of

ensre la the eLectora.

as rue as 00

Mcal wale Concres tenorted

buttins the Der voy

mind

WILLI

anxious

enan-

a Marvland supper De

nate

VIRGINIA SOUVENIR EDITION

hisculls,

and

perchance

terraom.

-Conunenta

Congress

cooked only

vas a

Marylander

kOR

Show In

days gone ov.

gathered some l5 years: belore and

several of them now came again to

After leaving Balumore the next

morning,

to lin

curing | o

artillery

General Washinglon was

tran

admirers ?

5900

All the

clergv of the citv and the high of-

ficials vied

WUD

each

oune

honor the man they had learned t

smues on as your

Two hundred and flity guests

was met on the border of Dela

sat down to this elegant entertain-

on sunday by a large group fron

Wilmingion.

Out of deference (O

dav.

Once

Iluminating

inse

as man

desired.

me

decoration of a vessel on the Dela

ware was substituted.

Before leav-

Wilmington, however, the next

mornin

address

rOm

toe burgesses and

common

com on me

Delaware accompanied her guest to

the

beel

feted Individual. The State author)-

Thes

800

10 da.

fort" and "thhomas Mifflir

- 006

suoreme

executiVa

olde

the legislature, accompaned Dy

old

Trooy,

went forth to greet

followed, and after

receluine

customary

sa.ule

congramla.

nera

washington was es-

corted into

unester

bre1s

and

On

deaun

Chector

tenerAl

Washington ordered his carriage to

the rear of the line, mounting

wOlTA

Thomson

and Humphreys were also mounted.

the procession advancad

usunIn

Ine

At Gray's Ferry Bridge.

next volt reached.

IMDOSIN

most

preparations

ace.

decorated

laurel and evergreen

peared on

one

them 11 lags swun

bae ams

the 11 States

that had adopted the

Consuuulion.

coratec.

holdav ar-

tire and the cheering as the Frest-

den eec

bridge,

with thousands on every

scene

trpn

wenta waso

Ton nascar

one of the arches a

re

was

Sower

upon his brow Dy

CharlAs

Wicon

Pale

Everywhere

near

Tashingion.

Long live

father of his people

Drocessed

neared

ment.

band

Music

daved

the dinner. and

9000

Drel

Toasts

UT oUIS

the

tenth of France.

Charles

the

fourth of

Spain

and the

wonted

Nomean

these being the coun-

had leamon

auscharge

Borora

leaving 10r

Phlladelphia

President-flest Washington wrote

John Langdon, or

namos

WRO

In New York

and

who had been one of the delegates

rom as native state ro•

ine con.

consu

all

DIU

tAmnore or ha sont

are

"Upon alightioe in

received

YOUT

Ith the resolution ofthe

mo mouses wig

accomosniedi

to inform you that knowing how

SHouses

mUst

proceed to business I

shau

tainly journey with as much dis-

DauCO

Dossiole.

night I purpose to be at Tren-

nient

following

Brunswick,

and noe

the

pleasure of meetine you at Ellza-

elton Dort on Thursdav morn-

ing."

Troop or Philadelphia

fully

inten

escorting

Washington to Trenton, but as

denArtu

the President

abardoning

uraD

unwilling to arive under

the protection of

d carrae

me on

to the elements.

broke about noon,

ana Le

taken acros

ens. a troop of horse

AV.

Doomin9

cannol

14724S Of

• of Trenton

An ever-memoraDe

when

the procession

whe

Assumbin

ureex

, the same body of water that

General Washington crossed during

the Revolution

upon the

• A triun

1009.

subnorted bu 18

columne

ever-

was raised over the bridge

decorated

Aman

from a Spanish merchant

sal

moore

cession- moved down

Market street

or elladd

toined en the celebration.

Upon it was inscribf

mae words

"he Dereno

er O

the Mothers Will

me Protector

of the Daughters:

Towering

this luscrioton,.

waInur

Streets, where a great ban*

Mowpra

creens.

were

these

dates,

"December

un

the summit re tha

arch

Jarge sunflower, designed to

s1000

Princeton.

-led

by Mrs, Richard Slockion,

one of the, New

signers,

Whom is given

verses sung by the young girls

waC

strewed. flawerstinitenern

wasO-

Ington's pathway.

unese

verses art

"Welcome mighty chief. once more,

Welcome to this grateful shore!

Now no mercenary 10e

agan the lata

hov-

Alms at thee the fatal

Virgins fair and matrons

did

conaur

bulld for thee triumphal bowers!

strew, ye 1alr his way with flowers-

Strew your heros way with

ers."

These young gIrIs

were

form

dresser

and as the

beautiful scene was enacted

era Washington stopped his

manu

those

mmessed

¡as wer

tears.' That evening General Wash-

ington spent at

airv

Tavern

Kept by Samuel Henry.

was soen

ar me on

or the nev

wunersooon.

lue

retired

president of Princeton College

one phase or General

Ton S

coaracter

was

punctilious in

connec

tion

the amenities

SOCial

He was pecularly allected

une

receoron

accord. um

-60t

Trenton and Princeton women, and

thar same

dav he

addressed

note

800

girls

who had taken

In 1a6 b69111111 ceremon whinn

General Washington

, tas nace wrhour evorace.

in his acknowledgements..

SMatrons

un so

novel and

pha. Arch at Trenton, for the

quIsite

sensation he ernarencad

affecting

omen

astonishing contrast between his

situation on

the spot--the elegant taste It

ed for the preseni occasion

-the Innocent appearance of the

white robed cholr who

amm

WILD

gratulatory song

an impression on his ra-

membrance as he

assures

will never De

President-elect

Washington

nearing the end or his long journer

WACD

-01za benn

here he recelved a Federal salute

de stooDed

at the public house of

Samuel Smith and breakfasted

nome of his old friend.

lias

marca

828117

taken up

large civlc and

wIch

Incuded

Newark and other

near-ov

places.

Elizabethport

a surprise a walted him,

ne learn

that his Journey W

be consid-

snortened.

marn

awalted him,

structed for the oC

casion to

him up the bay to New York.

no son waS

commander and

which was rowed by 13 masters

Vesses. dressed In while unlorms

and

cans

the ciners whichar

companied

It, were members or

comnittee appointed to meet

CAn-

pra

ashi

noton

and

109 preg

DarTV.

LanCon.

Charles Carroll.

and Wil.

lam Samuel Johnson for

the Sen

Roudinor.

Theoderlc

-dor

Tucker, Eg-

SdOUSe.

chancellor

LiVing

Jav

me

SectO.

Foreign

Samuel

Oscood

aruu

Tee

and Walter

Livingion

Commissloners

Of the

treasury.

General Knox, head

war Department; bbenezer Hazard

POST

master

Genera

mae

forces of New York State:

Rich-

Varick: and other dignitarles.

he unal

President

Washington at nis destination

it is some

war obscur

and Soa

israre

accoles

slow win

buvernments.

which

the

brilliancs

General Washington

tecenuon

In New Xork.

une

presidential barge at length

Wharl,

ana

President-eJect

washington

greeted by the Urine of

cann.

ringing of bells, and the blowing or

whistles, as the honored guests

conded the carpet

ed stairway or the

PAGE 3, SEC.

ferrv.

was-smov dressedn

plain sud consisting or n blue coal,

buff walstcoat, and breeches.

whole stve land manner

Was un-

assumin

quer chou.

The New

York

procession

WaR

head

Col.

Lewls

Moran.

consisted ormisc.?

troop or norse,

oucers

duty, a

com-

pany or grenadiers who served as

elect.

the governor and orcers

mne

congresslonal. com

une

mavor of New

York,

James .

he

corporation

the city, the French and

Spanish

alp omatic representatives,

anu

Whole parade

outale cuzens ne

Covero

Clinton's house

and finally stopped

at the mansion, which had been fIt.

siegl

mne

President elect's

After a brief re-

ception General Washineton drove

the

Governor's

From 1 untll 9 that

evening

whoe

atu

day had indeed

been

gonous

and in une

sides

heard words tat almost

wama

supreounn.

"He

aeserves

Some

- were even

in the remar, they asserted that

they

should now de content

there was nothin more

to add to

mer

happiness now that they had

seen the "Savlour of the Country.

Visitors Welcome-

To Inspect the Only Modern Dairy

Operated in Alexandria.

PASTEURIZATION MEANS PURITY

Alexandria Dairy Products Co.

Incorporated

Phone 407

Pitt and Princess

 

 

THE WASHINGTON AND OLD DOMINION RAILWAY SERVES

NORTHERN VIRGINIA FROM THE NATIONAL CAPITAL TO

THE BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS WITH A CONVENIENT

SCHEDULE OF PASSENGER TRAINS.

Local and Limited Trains

Safe and Dependable Service

Commodious and Comfortable Terminal

Courteous Employees

Washington

and Old Dominion Railway

The Washington and Old Dominion Railway, through its rail and water

connections, handles the Agricultural products of Northern Virginia to

all markets of the world. It also brings in to Northern Virginia the prod-

ucts of mines, forests and mills, as well as manufactured articles from

the great industrial centers of the world.

Standard Freight Service, Quick and Dependable

A Freight Department that Cooperates with Shippers

Joint Rates to all Points

 

 

PAGE 4, SEC. B

First Presidential Tour

New

England - Rhode Island

*

*

These Tours Designed by Washington to

Establish a Closer Relation between

the States Eminently Successful

WHEN General Washington be-

came President of the young

Republic he had brought into be-

ins, he decided to make a complete

tour of the entire territory com-

prising the United States. In the

autumn of his first year he started

this plan by visiting New England.,

between October 15 and November

13, 1789, omitting Rhode Island, as

she had not yet ratified the Consti-

tution. However,

he did visit the

smallest of the States between Au-

gust 15 and 22 the following year,

after she had fallen into line with

her sister States.

President Washington

anar

his

famlly

were

established

in

the

Presidential Home

in

New York

City and this trip,

as

all others

while he was President, was made

In, his state coach with outriders in

livery and mounted aldes.

He also

took along his own saddle horses,

so, that he could ride horseback 1f

the road and weather

conditions

made it

advisable.

He had felt

from the time of his inauguration

that It would only be through this

personal visitation to the different

parts of the new Nation that he

could get a clear idea of the peace-

time conditions under which the

people

were

living and working.

He wanted to view their industries,

their farms,

their

homes,

the

progress of manufactures, and the

development of all natural resources

that were slowly but surely bring-

ing national prosperity.

He

also

desired to get into personal touch

with the people of the country

tO

make his

own appeal

for

their

support of their new Government.

In his diary he recorded in de-

tail all of the places he visited,

even the

straggling hamlets

he

passed through and all of the mat-

ters of interest to him in each place.

He noted the condition, of houses,

outhouses,

public buildings,

the

population

each

rown

the

chuches, the business Interests, the

crops, and the state of Ilvestock,

Wherever he stopped long enough to

recetve addresses

and ovations ne

recorded his Impressions of the so-

cial life

Thus

posterity owes

its Irst President an excellent

pic-

ture

une

be

in

the

united

oral

during nis first

administraon.

one

CUn

Dut

won-

der at his energy

anchis devoton

to his country and his high sense

of responsibllity as Chief Executive

voluntary to undergo the fatigue

and discomforts of such journeys

under such strenuous conditions of

made+and highways

duck, linen, and woolens, and noted

the cider making, the cultivation of

the white mulberry for silk worms,

the making of lutestring from the

silk.

At Hartford,

after

partici-

pating in the ceremonies prepared

In his honor. he viewed the woolen

manufactory

and

ordered

broadcloth for a suit for himself

and a piece of bolt of other mate-

riäl for breeches for

his servants.

Of the people of Massachusetts he

recorded:

"There 1s a great equality in

the People of this State.

Few or

no opulent men-and no poor-

great similitude in

their bulld-

ings-the general

fashion

chimney

(always of

Stone or brick) and door in the

middle with

staircase fronting

the former--two flush stories with

latter, running up by the side of

a very good show of sash and

glass windows-the size generally

is from 30 to 50 feet in length,

and from 20 to 30 feet in width,

exclusive of a back shed, whicn

seems to be added as the family

increases."

At

Spencer the President

"Te-

ceived the messenger with Gover-

nor Hancock's invitation to be his

guest, which he declined, as he did

all such on his journeys.

At Wor-

cester he rode through the town

on

horseback

at the

request

of

some of his old soidiers, who de-

sired to see their former chief in

the manner they best knew and

loved him.

Before reaching the city of Bos-

ton he was met by a company of

the Middlesex Militia, who saluted

him with 13 guns, and who desired

to make arrangements for the cere-

monies planned for

Boston

and

Cambridge,

Although

the Presi-

dent desired to avoid these elabo-

rate ceremonles, the people would

not be denied.

They

arrived at

Cambridge al

10 o'clock, where the militia made

a brave showing, and there Lleut.

Gov. Samuel Adams met him with

the

executive council to escort him

Into

the

city,

where the selectmen

nad arrane

parade.

The

school

of

cambridge wero accorded the

lege

SOT

escortn

the Boston une

At the Statehouse he appeared in

the balcony to receive the applause

of the people and listen to an ode

composed in his honor,

Memory

must have carried George Wash-

Ington back to the days of his

he was met by the President of the

State, the Vice President, and some

of the council,, with troops of norse

in handsome unforms . This State

rivaled Massachusetts

and

Con-

necticut in its efforts to do honor

to the distinguished visitor, and on

November 2, 1789, the President,

accompanied

by.

State

officials,

went sight-seeing by boat in the

harbor of Portsmouth, stopping at

Kittery, Maine.

They viewed the

old fort at the entrance of the har-

bor, which had been the scene

one of the first exploits of the Revo-

lution. and which saluted him with

13

guns; and then proceeded to

give the jaunt a real holiday touch

by trying their luck at cod fish-

ing.

The President recorded the

results:

"But it not being proper

time of tide, we only caught two."

This practically ended the trip,

and the return journey was made

as rapidly as possible.

Our ofte-

gard for the law of Connecticut

against traveling on Sunday,

the

President wrote under the date of

November 8, 1789:

"It being contrary to law and

disagreeable to the people of this

State (Connecticut) to- travel on

the Sabbath day-and my horses

after passing through such intol-

erable

roads,

wanting rest,

I

stayed at Perkins Tavern (which

by the way, is not a good one),

all

day-and a meeting house being

within a few rods of the door,

I attended morning and evening

services and heard

very

lame

discourses from a Mr. Pond."

He reached New York on Novem-

ber 13, just in time to put in an

appearance at one of Mrs. Wash-

ington's receiptions.

President Washington started on

his 5-day

tour

of Long Island on

April 20, 1790,

He traversed the

territory

fully

as

conditions

would permit and

irrote observa-

tions in his

diary which indicate

his invariable interest in agricul-

tural matters:

"This Island (as far as I went)

from West to East seems to be

equally divided between flat and

Hilly land,

the

former on

the

South next the Seaboard, and the

latter on the No. next the Sound.

The highland they say

best

and most productive, but the

other is the pleasantest to work,

except in wet seasons when from

the

levelness of them they are

sometimes,

(but not

frequently

having a considerable portion of

Sand) incommoded by heavy and

continual

rain. From

com-

parative view of their crops they

may

-De

averaged as follows:

Indian Corn 25 bushels-Wheat

15-Rye 12-Oats 15 bushels to

the

acre.

According

to

their

accts from

Lands highly

nured

50

of

the first. 25 of the 2d and 3d.

-9.10

more or

une

Matter

Towards

close

Of

the

Snows

they

SOl

Clover

from

Ib:

an

quart

or

MimotI1

Seed.

strom

to

accoran

AS

the grass remains or as the con-

dition

of the

ground

15,

for

50

soon as they find it beginning to

VIRGINTA SOUVE

bind,

they plow.

Their

first

plowing (with the Patent tho'

they call It the Dutch plow) 1s

well executed at the depth of

about 3 or at most 4 Inches--the

cut being 9 or 10 Inches and the

sod neany and very

evenly

turned. With Oxen they plough

mostly. They do no more than

turn the ground in this manner

for Indian Corn before it is

planted; making the holes in

which it is placed with hoes the

rows being marked off by

stick-twoor

three

workings

afterwards with the Harrows or

Plough is all the cultivation it

receives generally,

Their fences,

where there is no Stone, are very

indifferent; frequently of plashed

trees of any and every

kind

which have grown by chance;

but it exhibits an eviderice that

very good fences may be made in

this manner neither of white Oak

or

Dogwood which: from this

mode of treatment grows thick-

est,

and most stubborn.-This

however, would be no defense

against Hogs."

Upon the adjournment of Con-

gress, August 12, 1790, General

Washington decided to visit Rhode

Island, as it had rattfied the Con-

-stitution the past May. His party

started August 15 in

Rhode

Island packet, making the trip by

sea-the only sea voyage recorded

by Washington in his life except the

Barbados experience in his youth.

At Newport, on the 17th, he was

received with enthusiasm, with sa-

lutes and a long procession await-

ing at the wharf to greet him. A

walk about the town was followed

by a dinner at the Statehouse.

The next day, after the ad-

dresses of the morning, the Prest-

dent departed for Providence. The

passage to this place was tedious,

consuming seven hours.

A

more

formal procession, headed by the

governor of the State, with troops

and bands, greeted him on arrival.

After

tea at Daggett's Tavern the

President'

was

prevailed upon to

view the illumination of the college

to please the students.

The next

day the President decided to walk

about

town, In the course of which

he visited the college, Inspected it

minutely.

went aboard a large In-

diaman of 900 tons which was on

the stocks, received the addresses of

Cincinnati,

the

Colee

of

city

Frovidence.

dinner

He

then

artended

with

or

200.

calkens

lO

TOWn

after

embarked

tar

New

York.

On

September

Brown

College conferred

the

08-

gree of Doctor of Laws upon Gen-

eral Washington.

 

chel

Executive

voluntariv

LO

an ascomrorts

of

sun journeys

under such strenuous conditions

of

travel

95

the roads and highways

of the period must have Imposed

upon a man no longer young

and

In the case of the first tour Just

recovering

from

& Dain

and

serious 11lness.

His start from New York is thus

described in his own diary:

"Thursday 15th (October 1789)

Commenced my Journey about 9

o'clock for Boston and a tour

through the Eastern States.

The

Chief Justice,

Mr. Jay and the

Secretaries of the Treasury and

War: Departments accompanied

me some distance out of the city.

About 10 o'clock 1t began to Rain,

and continued to do so till 11,

when we arrived at the house of

one Hoyatt who keeps a Tavern at

Kingsbridge, where we, that is,

Major Jackson, Mr. Lear and my-

self with six servants, which com-

- posed my. Retinue, dined.

After

dinner

through

frequent

light

showers we proceed'd to the Tav-

ern of a Mrs. Haviland at Rye;

who keeps a very neat and de-

cent Inn."

Some idea of the close observa-

ton and the careful detail with

- which President Washington kept

a record of his journeys may

gathered from this first day's rec-

ord in his diary:

"The Read for the greater part,

ludeed the whole way, was very

rough and stoney, but the Land

strong, well covered with grass

and a luxuriant crop of Indian

Corn intermixed with Pompions

(pumpkins) (which were yet un-

gathered) in the fields.

We met

four droves of Beef Cattle for the

New

York Market (about 30 in

a drove) some of which were very

fine-also a flock of Sheep for

the

some

place.

We

scarcely

passed a farm house that did not

abide

uin

Geese. Their

cattle

seemed to be of a good quality,

their hogs large but rather long

legged."

They visited Norwalk and Fair-

feld,

which

still

showed

the

marks

of the British foray

in

1779.

All of the way into New

Haven the little party received in

every town and hamlet salutes and

greetings showing the honor and

reverence felt for their President.

"Light your bonfires,

the white

chariot is coming over the

hill."

seemed to be a clarion call to which

the

housewives,

farmers,

me-.

chanics, and clerks all left their

tools-and their tasks to rush to

the roadsides to see the President

go by in his handsome state coach.

with its white and gold elegance,

its leather cushions and silk cur-

tains, and the Washington coat of

arms and mottoes on its door pan-

els.

Addresses

of

welcome,

bell

ringing, triumphal arches, cannon

salutes, banquets, and every honor

that the people could devise

was

paid to their leader, to whom each

town was just as important as its

predecessor on his itinerary and re-

ceived from him the closest Inspec-

tion.

In thee places he ale visiled the

plants that were

manufacturing

chor

tne people and listen

composed

his

honor

Memorv

must

have

carried

teorge wasn-

Ington

back

a TO

the

days

his

youth in 1756.

when In spruce and

handsome uniform he came to Bos-

ton to demand of Governor Shirley

proper recognition of provincial of-

ficers by commission of the Vir-

ginia Governor in relation to those

appointed by the King.

Once again

it must have recast the stage and

the setting for the events of his

taking command of the Army

at

Cambridge, of his anxious waiting

for Colonel Knox and the Ticon-

deroga cannon to make the Dor-

chester Heights feat possible, and

in his mind he must have con-

trasted the peaceful scenes in Bos-

ton Harbor with those of the evacu-

ation of

the

British troops and

ships.

John Adams, Vice President, ac-

companied him to his lodgings and

dined with him, Governor Hancock

having sent word of an attack of

gout that made it impossible to pre-

sent

himself to

the

President.

Upon the receipt of this the Presi-

dent

excused himself from dining

with the governor, feeling that he

was but trying to evade making the

first call, and President Washing-

ton resolved once for all to make

it very plain that the office of the

President of the United States was

above that of the governors of the

States.

Many

honors filled

the

day, and the next day Governor

Hancock managed to present him-

self at the President's lodgings

af-

ter being made to realize that un-

less he cld so he would not see his

Chief Executive.

According to le-

agend he was bundled in red flan-

nel to emphasize his illness.

Of the duck manufactory, which

greatly interested him,

the Presi.

dent's diary records:

"They

have

manufactured 32

pieces of Duck, of 30 to 40 yards

week,

They have 28

looms and 14 girls at work spin-

hing with both hands (the flax

being tied to their waste.

Chil-

dren (girls) turn the wheels for

them and with this assistance the

spinner can turn out 14 lbs. of

Thread pr. day when they stiek

to it, but as they are pd. by the

piece, or the work they do, there

no other restratnt upon them but

to

come

at 8

o'clock in

the

morning and return at 6 in the

evening.

They are daughters of

decayed families and are girls of

Character--none others are ad-

mitted."

Visits

to other factories were

followed by a tour of French war-

ships and his attendance of an as-

sembly in the evening, where there

were upwards of 100 ladtes, whose

appearance was recorded as

"ele-

geant."

and many of them very

handsome.

The President visited Harvard

College at Cambridge accompanled

by the

Vice

President and

Mr.

Bowdoln.

At

Beverly

waS

much interested

in

the

cotton

manufactory, for he realized

the

importance of domestic cotton man-

ufacture.

In his diary he record-

ed all of the processes, which he

watrhed with deepest interest.

At the New Hampshire State line

ereC

ern

DoCtOr

200 YEARS

ONLY two centuries have passed since the world was siven

George Washington. Yet these two centuries have witnessed

mighty changes. A little group of colonies have banded together

and gained their independence. They have framed an immortal

political document, the Constitution. Liberty has become a living

principle respected by all mankind. A new nation has taken its

place beside the great powers. America may well rejoice that'

across these pages of history is largely written the name of one

man, George Washington.

GREETINGS VISITORS

and welcome to Washington's home town. When in

Alexandria we invite you to stop here for your auto-

mobile needs. Enjoy the comfort of our large, well

equipped rest rooms. Let us direct you to the fam-

ous Washington School, only one square away.

Automobile Accessories

Gasoline and Oils

Tires and Tubes

Storage

"We Serve to Serve Again"

CENTRAL AUTOMOBILE COMPANY

500 South Washington St.

Phone Alex. 1973

On the Mount Vernon Memorial Highway

 

CAZETTO

ENIR

EDITION

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LATEST NEWS

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comments on conditions. events

and people in a briliant

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offer the lowdown

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sets forth

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daily events in "Heraldings."

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Tells of life on Broadway

in his inimitable war

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shows the political situation

on Capitol Hill daily.

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lays bare the heart of the

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gives Herald readers the

benefit of his financial knowledge.

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arranges stories of tha

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AND COMICS

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THE ALEXANDRIA GAZETTE

VIRGINIA SOUVENIR EDITION

PAGE 5, SEC. B

IMPORTANT DATES IN WASHINGTON'S EARLY AND MASONIC LIFE

 

Compiled by Chalmers L. Pancoast

1657--John

Washington,

great-

grandfather of George Washington,

landed in Virginia,

located in

Westmoreland County seventy-five

miles from present Capital.

Died

1677-age 54.

Buried at Bridge's

Creek.

1661-John

Washington,

great-

grandfather of George Washington,

was churchwarden of old White

Chapel Lancaster County parish in

which he resided, was given and

still retains name of Washington.

1661-Lawrence Washington, eld-

est son of Colonel John Washing-

ton, and father of George, was

born

in

Westmoreland County,

Virginia.

1730-June

5th-Daniel

Coxe

was appointed the First Provincial

Grand Master of Freemasons of

New York, New Jersey and Penn-

sylvania by Deputation from the

Duke of Norfolk, Grand Master of

England.

1731-Earliest known Lodge

of

Freemasons in

America-at.Sun

Tavern,

Philadelphia.

Benjamin

Franklin was Master of this lodge

in 1734,

1732-February 22nd

Born at

Wakefield,

Va.

Introduction

of

Freemasonry to America nearly

the same time.

1735-Solomon's Lodge No.

Savannah, Georgia, founded, one of

oldest Lodges in America.

General

Oglethorpe, of Colonial Army, was

one of the founders.

1735-Fredericksburg Lodge No.

4A.

F. and A.

M., in which

Brother

George Washington was

raised "was supposed to have been

organized at this early date though

records have disappeared."

1739-George Washington lived

at homestead

on

Rappahannock

1739 to 1747. His father died here

In 1742.

1752-November 4th

Masonic

Birthday.

First person to be ini-

tiated in Fredericksburg Lodge No.

4-Major George Washington-sec-

ond story of the Market

House,

corner

Main

Street and Market

Alley-(torn down).

Entrance fee

£5 2 s. Requirements were

"ma-

ture age"-George Washington was

Initiated 3 months before of age.

1753-March 3rd-Passed a Fel-

lowcraft in Fredericksburg Lodge

No.

4 at Fredericksburg, Va.

1753-August 4th-Raised to the

Sublime Degree of Master of Ma-

son in Fredericksburg Lodge. Craft-

ed after twenty-one years of age.

But Old Charges Constitution 1723

required candidate to be of mature

age.

1755-

-September Ist-Vistted his

Lodge before

leaving

for Western

country.

First mission after being

made a Mason was to visit French

Military Posts on Ohio River. Les-

so175

of

Masonry reflected

in

his

early life

1755-January 4th-Again visited

his Lodge,

Fredericksburg

No.

1756- New Enzland.

Cal. George

Washington

as

Commander-In-

Chief of Virginia Militla first vis-

ited Boston, Mass., to see Governor

Shirley

to

present troublesome

question

of military

precedence

raised by the action of the British

Captain Dagworthy at Fort Cum-

berland.

1756

- Tradition

has it

that

Washington attended the "Lodge of

Social and Milltary Virtues" No.

227-at New York, Philadelphla and

Boston.

A

lodge

legalized

by

Grand Lodge of Ireland.

1759

- Mount Vernon became

property of George Washington and

was his. home until 1799, when he

passed to his Great Reward.

1759-George

Washington mar-

ried Martha Custis, a widow with

two children,

Martha

and

John

Custis. Martha died when a child

John married, had four children

and died in 1781.

1764-Earllest records of meet-

ings of Masons In Hallfay.

1770-November 2nd-In autumn

of this year George Washington

hunted buffalo and bear while on

trip to the Ohio with his friend,

Dr. Craik.

In his diary of Novem-

ber 2nd is found this interesting

Item-"We proceeded up the river

(Kanhawa) with the -canot about

four

miles more,

and then en-

camped and went a hunting; killed

five buffaloes and wounded some

others, three dear, etc. This coun-

try abounds in • buffalo and wild

game of all kinds as also in all

kinds of wild fowl, there being in

the bottoms a great many

small

grassy ponds or lakes which are full

of swans, geese and ducks of dif-

ferent kinds."

1770-December 27th

General

Washington attended the Festival of

St. John the Evangelist with Amer-

ican Union Army Lodge at the Mor-

ris Hotel, Morristown, N. J.

1772-Washington's mother mov-

ed to what is now known as Mary

Washington House in Fredericks-

burg, where she remained until her

death.

1775--February

20th

Colonel

Washington was elected member of

Second

Provincial Convention

for

Fairfax County.

1775-July

3rd--Cambridge-Col-

onel Washington first took com-

mand of Continental Army at Can-

bridge under Famous Old Elm, the

most celebrated tree in America.

Elm trees belng planted as memo-

rials today

were propagated from

this old tree.

1775

- July 2nd

Washington,

Commander-in-Chief

of Colonial

forces,

had

support of Masonic

Brethren'-John Hancock. Benjamin

Franklin,

Paul Revere, John Hay,

Peyton

Randolph,

Robert Living-

ston,

Roger

Sherman

Masons

among

Washington's

Generals-

Ethan

Allen,

Nathanlel

Greene,

William

Moultrie, "Mad Anthony"

Wayne, "John Stark," "Lighthorse"

Harry Lee, Irsnel Putnam, Lafayette

1715-Cambridge, June 23rd-July

2nd-Washington as Cormander-

in-Chlef of the Continentl Army

established headquarters at Can-

bridge in what is known as Wads-

worth House, the official residence

of President of Harvard College.

1775-Boston-Revolutionary War

began in earnest with General

Washington's siege of Boston.

1775-May 10th-Second Contl-

nental Congress assembled in the

State House (Independence Hall)

in Philadelphia; John

Hancock

was elected president on Randolph's

departure.

June

15th,

on

John

Adam's mountain, Colonel George

Washlngton of Virginla was elected

General and Commander-In-Chief

of the Army of the United Col-

onies. Accepted June 16th, and

commissioned June 19th.

1776-March 17th-A day which

will always stand out as one of the

most glorious days in the drama of

the American Revolution.

George

Washington electrified the colonies

with the message that the British

had vacated Boston without de-

stroying it.

- - 1776-December-Visited Grand

Lodge of New York.

Celebration of

Festival of St. John the Evangelist.

1776-"With the death of Grand

Master Monfort in 1776 the Grand

Lodge of America expired."

1776-Ten Military Lodges dur-

in Revolution-one warranted by

New York, two by Massachusetts,

seven

by

Pennsylvania.

General

Washington met with brethren on

Masonic Level at Valley Forge.

1776-February-American Union

Lodge established in Army camps

by petition granted by Grand Lodge

of Massachusetts.

Famous Masonic

Lodges during Revolution.

Seal of

American Union Lodge engraved by

Paul Revere,

1776-Dark days in Masonry in

Colonies.

Grand

Lodge

of

New

York dissolved. Labors of Grand

Lodge of Pennsylvanla suspended.

Virginia, North Carollna and Mas-

sachusetts lost Grand Masters.

1777-May 6th-Delegates met at

Williamsburg "for purpose of con-

sidering the state of the Fraternity

in Virginia, and to

convass

the

questlon of placing at the head of

the Craft a Grand Master.

1777-June 23rd-General George

Washington proposed

ac

Grand

Master of Virginia.

Present jewel

of Grand Master of Virginia de-

signed to be worn

by

George

Washington as First Grand Master,

engraved-"Original Jewel made Ir

1778 to be worn by George Wash-

ington as

First Grand Master of

Virginia.

He declined the office,

belng in

command of the Army.

It was,

therefore,

frst worn by

Gov. John Blair, who was the First

Grand Master."

1777

Revolutionary

War

de-

stroyed connectlon

between

Col-

onles

and

Webb

Great

Britain-Joseph

elected

Grand

of

america.

1789-September 3rd-Stars and

Stripes were unfurled in land con-

flict at battle of Brandywine, state

of Delaware.

1178 - December

28th - George

Washington was present at Ma-

sonlc Festival of St. John

the

Evangelist in Philadelphia-march

ed in procession.

1748-December-Grand Lodge of

Philadelphla' celebrated Festival of

St. John

the Evangelist marking

First Dedication to Washington.

1199-June 24th-General Wash-

ington attended with the American

Union Lodge the celebration of the

Festlval of St. John the Baptist 'at

Robinson House, West Point, Hud-

son River, N. Y.

1779-October 6th

- Washington

(Military) Lodge was instituted by

the Lodge of Massachusetts. Wash-

ington was a frequent visttor ' in

this Lodge.

1779-December

15th-Proposed

by

American

Union

(Military)

Lodge,

at Morristown, N. J.,

AS

General Grand Master

of the

United States.

1779-December 20th

Proposed

by the Grand Lodge of Pennsyl-

vania as General Master of the

United States.

1799-December 27th-Celebrated

with American

Union

¡(Military)

Lodge, the Festival of St. John the

Evangelist, at Morristown, N. J, at

the Morris Hotel.

1780-January

13th --Grand

Lodge of Pennsylvanla agaln at-

tempted to elect General Washing-

ton Grand Master of Masons of the

United

States.

Only Mason: so

honored in

history

of American

Masonry. Records read:

"His Ex-

cellency George Washington, Gen-

eral and

Commander-in-Chief of

Army of United States being first

in nomination, he was balloted for

as

Grand

Master,

And

elected

unanimously

by

vote

of

whole

Lodge."

Grand Lodge of Massa-

chusetts killed movement.

1781-John Custis, son

of Mar-

tha

Washington,

died.

Washing-

ton adopted John's two children,

Nellie and Parke Custis.

1781-Reception given to General

Washington and staff by City of

Fredericksburg after surrender

of

Cornwallis at Yorktown. • Painting

of this event adorns north wall of

Lodge Room of Alexandria No.

1781-October 19th-Lord Corn-

wallis

surrendered

to

General

Washington his British Army of

7,073 officers and private soldiers

terminating war of Independence-

assuring victory of Colonials and

French allies.

1781-October-Sald to have vis-

ited with General Lafayette, Lödge

No. 9 at Yorktown, Virginia, after

the

surrender of Cornwallis there.

1782-Presented with a Masonic

apron and other Masonic regalia

by brothers Watson and Coussol

Nantes.

pirance.

gifts

August

faknowledsed

of

LOe

 

n'

d

15

de

d

le

&

he

at

nd

it-

18-

ne

50

an

¿X-

of

I'sl

for

ted

ole

98 -

ar-

18-

en,

ral

of

of

Ing

of

ral

of

*IS

id

1182-General Washlngton,dellv-

ered address at Lodge In Newburgh,

New York, which quelled rebellion

amor.g soldlers.

1382-June 24th-Celebrated with

American Union (Military) Lodge

the festival of St. John the Baptist

at West Point. New York.

1782-December 27th-Records of

Solomon's Lodge No. 1, Pough-

keepsie state-"Visitors - Brother

George. Washington, Commander-

In-Chlef, celebrated Festival of St.

John the Evangelist with breth-

ren."

1783-May 15th-Society of Cin-

cinnat1-an hereditary patriotic so-

clety was organized by American

and, forelgn officers of the Conti-

nental Army on the Hudson River

near Fishkill, N.'Y. To perpetuate

fricndship through

closest male

posterity. Named society after Ro-

man prototype, Luctus

Quinctlus

Cincinnatus.

1483-General George Washing-

ton was one of the first advocates

of the Erie, Canal. When he went

to

Schenectady to

discuss

his

dreams of a water route between

Albany and the Great Lakes he

* met with a cold reception.

But

Washington' dreams continued in

the hearts of other men--DeWitt

Clinton, Governor of New York and

distingulshed Masons carrled the

project through to completion in

1825. The story of the Erle Canal

Is the realization of George Wash-

Ington's dream

1184-June 24th-George Wash-

ington attended Festival of St.

John the Baptist with Alexandria

Lodge No. 39-Alexandria, Virginia

1181-June 24th-At a

meeting

held in Alexandria, Virginia, Lodge

No. 39, then under Jurisdiction of

Pennsylvania, Grand Lodge, made

Washington an honorary member

of that Lodge, thereby becoming a

Pennsylvania 'Mason.

Regular at-

tendant, from 1783.

1581-August

Presented

with

Masonic Apron by Marquis de La-

layette, made by. Mlle. Lafayette,

embroidered

with

Masonic

Em-

blems.

Now In Museum, of Grand

Lodge of Pennsylvania.

1785-George Washington found-

ed first free school in Virginia in

Washington School Building, Alex-

andria, Virginia.

1785-Grand Lodge of New York

dedicated New Book of Constitu-

ton to Worshipful Brother George

Washington.

1785-February 12th-Walked in,

the Masonic Procession at the Fu-

neral

of. Brother William Ramsay

at Alexandria, Va.

1787-

-George Washington elected

President

Genera

of

Society

of

Oncinnati and re-elected until his

death.

Alexander

ceded him.

Hamilton

Request

made

by

Alexandria Lodge No. 39, A. F. and

A

M.,

to change

to

Alexandria

Washington Lodge No. 22, A. F. and

M.

1188-November 22nd

- Elected

Worshipful Master, Washington-

Alexandria Lodge No. 22-Ancient

York Masons. Grand Lodze

of

Virginia granted new warrant to

Lodge making Worshipful Brother

George Washington first Master

after changing number from 39 to

22.

1188-Washington County, Ohio,

first settlement In state at Marl-

etta.

1189-April 30th-Oath of office

as First Presldent of the United

States administered on Lodge Bible

from St. John No. 1, New York

City. President Worren G. Hard-

ing also took oath of office on same

Bible.

Still In possession of St.

John No, 1, as sacred relic of Rob-

ert R. Livingston,

Chancellor of

State of New York and Grana

Master of the Grand Lodge of New

York,

administered

10

George

Washington oath of office of First

President of the Unlted States.

1789-March 7th-Made honor-

ary member of Holland Lodge, New

York City.

1789-Boston,

October 24th to

29th-Washington as President of

the United States made a tour of

New England states.

1790-Generál

Jackson,

Grand

Master of Masons of Georgia, pre-

sented to Washington Address of

the Hebrew Congregation of Sa-

vannah, Ga.

1790-August-Honored by Klng

David's Lodge, Newport,

Rhode

Island.

1791-April 15th-Welcomed

by

brethren of St. John Lodge No.

Newbern, N. C., "with the mystic

numbers" and attended a ball in

the evening.

1791-Grand Lodge of Virginia

dedicated Book of Constitution to

Worshlpful Brother George Wash-

Ington.

N91-May-While on a visit to

Charleston,

South

Carolina,

waS

greeted

by Gen. Mcrdecai

Gist.

Grand Master of the Grand Lodge

of South Carolina,

who extended

the greetings of that Grand Lodge.

1792-January 21st

- Worshipful

Brother George Washington

pre-

sented with address by Grand Lodge

of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia.

1792-Wooden statue of George

Washington

erected

at

Bowling

Green near Battery Park to replace

the statue of King George. It was

first statue of Washington erected

in New

York.

It stood from

1792

to 1843 in small

park at Bowling

Green, and was later sold at auc-

tlon.

1793-January 9th-The first air

passport

issued

by

George

Washington

to

Blanchard

when the

latter made the first bal.

loon flight ever made on the West-

ern

Hemisphere,

1703--March

4th-Philadelphin-

Washington took oath of office for

second term at high noon.

1793-September 18th

George

Washington. President of the U. 8

A. In ceremony with Grand Lodge

of Maryland and Washington-

Alexandria No. 22 and several other

Lodges of F. and A. MI. laid corner-

stone of the Capitol of the United

States In the City of Washington.

George Washington was then Past

Master of Alexandria-Washington

No, 22.

Clothed with Apron and

Masonic Insignia Gavel used now

in Georgetown No. 9 at the request

of the Deputy Grand Master of

Maryland presided as Grand Mas-

ter pro tem and lald cornerstone

1793- September 18th & Gavel

used by George Washington In lay-

ing cornerstone of Capitol at Wash-

Ington now In possession of Po-

tomac

Lodge No. 5, Georgetoxn,

D. C. Washington marched In pro-

cession and presided as Grand

Master pro tem and lald the cor-

nerstone.

1193-September 18th - HIstoric

trowel used In laying cornerstone of

Capitol of the U. S: A.-Inscribed

"This trowel the property of Alex-

indria-Washington Lodge No. 22, A.

P. and A. M., was used by Gerieral

Washington, September 18th, 1793,

to lay cornerstone of the Capltol

of the Unlted States of Amerlca at

Washington, D. C."

1794-Late in year Alexandria

Lodge received and accepted the

Masonic portrait of Washington,

panted by Williams of Philadei-

phla, Pa., on order from the Lodge

for which Washington sat while in

that city some time in the latter

part of 1793 or early part of 1794.

1797-Washington Masonlc Medal

struck one side profile of bust of

Washington

in

Military

dress

"George

1797.

Washlngton,

President

*Other

side Masonic em-

blems-Inscribed "Amor, Honor Et

Justicia-G. W.. G. G. M.." which

stood for Geperal Grand Master.

1796-May 14th-Houdon statue

of Washington placed in rotunda of

Capital building

Richmond,

Virginia, never officially dedicated

until May 14th. 1931.

1797-March 28th

- Received a

delegation from Alexandria Lodge

and accepted an invitation to be

present in Alexandria April 1st.

1797-April 1st-

•Attended

Alex-

andria Lodge and at the banquet

proposed the toast,

"The Lodge of

Alexandria and all Masons through-

out the world."

1798

November 8th

Grand

Lodge

of Maryland presented ad-

dress

when

Washington

Lleutenant General of a Provislonal

Army ordered by Congress after his

retirement,

1799-February 22nd-Nellie Cus-

L8, naple

daughter

of

George

Washington, was married at Mount

Vernon to Lawrence Lewis, one of

the sons of Washington's only sis-

ter

Betty

Washington Lewks.

1799-December

14th-Died

Vernon. Virginia, age 68.

Fu-

neral by Masonic LoaRe No. 22 al

Alexandria, Va.

Masonie apron

and two crossed swords were placed

upon coffin.

1800-"Lite of Washington con-

talning cherry tree story" written

"'by Mason Locke Weema, an Epis-

copal clergyman. Book was repub-

lished and enlarged thereafter. For

more than half a century Weemr

"Life of Washington" was one of

the best sellers in this country.

1818-1819-Thomas Sully, distin-

gushed artist, made historlo paint-

Ing of "Washington Crossing the

Delaware." It WRs Sully who con-

ceived the idea of reproducing

Washington's

great masterpiece,

"The Farewell Address."

'1800-January 14th-Washington

Society of Alexandria organized to

perpetuate care of orphans which

had been charges of General Wash-

Inston. In 1785 Me was providing

for twenty and at the time of hia

death the number was greater.

1832-Cornerstone of original

Mary Washington, Monument laid

with Masonic ceremonies at Fred-

ericksburg. Banner used durlog

ceremony now memento in Fred-

ericksburg Lodge No. 4.

1811-Masons 'of Charleston,

W.

Va, held celebration to commemo-

rate the Masonic meetings held in

Washington's Masonic Cave during

Prench War.

1862-December

Records and

paraphernalla

of

Fredericksburg

Lodge No. 4, A. F, and A. M. were

carried away by Federal soldiers.

Years later many relics were re-

turned.

•1883-Washington Arch: foot of

Fifth Avenue entrance to Washing-

ton Square. '

erected

in

1883 to

honor memory of George Washing-

"ton.+

1890-Mar 30th-Layinz corner-

stone of Washington Memorial Arch

at Washington Square and Fifth

Avenue, New York City,

A public

Masonic ceremony conducted by the

M. W. Grand Master. assisted by

Grand officers of the Grand Lodze

of the State of New York.

1893-

Cornerstone of later Mary

Washington Monument lad in Fred-

ericksburg. Virginin,

Masonio Ban-

ner used at laying of cornerstone of

First Monument,

also

Washington

Monument in Capitol, Washington

Monument

in

Richmond and the

Washington

Memorial Temple

1900-

George

Washington

"The

Father of His Country." unanimous-

Jy elected to Hall of Fame br

97

ores

the

largest vote

ever

cast for

name honored by

being

elected

 

 

When You Come To Washington

for the

Bicentennial

You will of course visit Mt.

Veron,

Washington's

Home and Historic Alex-

andria his home town

FEMI

Deluxe parlor coaches leave terminal every hour on the hour,

starting at 9 a. m., daily except Sunday.

You may go when you wish, stay as long as you like and stop-

over at Alexandria,

ONE DOLLAR

FOR THE ROUND TRIP

Write for FREE Folder

Describing Trip

Special Rates and Busses

for Parties

The Mount Vernon Line

United Bus Terminal, 11th & Pa., Avenue, N. W., Washington,

, D. C

Phone National 9711-9712

 

 

 

1732

1032

Economy makes happy

homes and sound nations

s. .instil it deep.

give thing

What Washington preached, Penney's practices:

economy

thru minimum operating cost.

•economy

thru maximum buying

power.

economy

that's

always passed

on to

YOU

J. C. Penney Co. m

SIX FIFTEEN KING STREET

ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA

 

 

 

PAGE 6, SEC. B

Preparations for Christmas at

Mount Vernon Were Elaborate

Christmas Days of

Long Ago Quaint-

ly Observed

WASHINGTON AND SALLY FAIRFAX AT A

CHRISTMAS DANCE

WHAT did Georse Washington

say about Christmas? Not until

the

year

1751 is

1 anvthing found

his

diary concerning

full period of the year.

This

does

not mean however that he

was nob

deeply interested 1n. this

glad-

some dav as anv other boy

or man

or his

time.

reference to a

mas dinner in his diary is recorded

on December 25, 1751,

during his

the Barbadoes which was

taxen on accou

of the ill health

or his half-brother Lawrence:

entry reads: "Christmas day fine

and

clear

and pleasant with

ate sea tho continuance of the trade

twind which, by observation nad

set us in the latitude Or lo

degrees

30 minutes. We dined on an Irish

Washington converse

upon political

nolaays are at hand. ther

shall

subjects without reserve, and to hear

more

ordinary meetings

hoose.

beef, etc.

General and Mrs. Pinckney relate

this board between this

dare

and

But it was at Mount Vernon that

what they saw and heard in france.

three weeks after Christmas

une

•aristmas preparaton

were made

on 9 grand scale.

few days be•

fATA

Christmas,

TInC

was truly a feast to me. Inus

moments glided away

days

When our reason oolted

court messenger.

is order

summon any one in the meantime"

this note in Washington's journaf:

and

cure

from

mV

plantations to

aSSIST

laying in

stock of

Tire

Christmas."

Preparation®

this

character

evidently was an annual event

de.

cause in 1787 we find this observa-

propriety

our del

and

proving the good roads;

Shon

them better

than

Jon.

• Smith,

who

Anna Winslow

Puritan

woman

while visiting

"ner

aun1

Boston

gossioy

diarv

things inar

nappened

mentioning

a oarcar Carismas.

The diary

was

adoressed to nel

suouer.

Anna

was nor

termed

than a cenuury,

enioved Christmas

dinner

jamestow

better

ine

-120

parvaker.

cod

But. then

must be

boor selle was

more oimon

then than

nOW.

sne

tion

written

Washington:

hand

from each

plantation

cent

Old

- Worlds

Here

he

said

December Ie.

1.00e

oaservarions•

"The

weather

the mansion house

Christmas, the carts

Ferry, French's and Dogue Run

about

i one Or

uThe

extreme winde, rayne,

and snow caused us to keepe

and walking

have

beer.

VERY

WII-

like.

I went to Mrs.

Whitwell's

last Wednesdar-vou

taught mA

companying them in order to dra

those days tney

did not

.• dinone

the savages

never

more merrie, nor fed on

more plenty

good ovsters.

fish

the

the

week,

my

it should be

spelt

kitchens equipped wit

"he

waS done in monster fire-

daces.

dinner

considereu

wilde

TOWI

an

good bread

Wednesday.

My aunt also savs that

nor never had better

ures

une-

till I come out of an

land."

Tr. was on

Christmas

Day,

of laughterre

mar 15

ao

to sele

unless; there

•WaS

home cured, home smoked and home

that Captain smith was saved Irom

fatal head

and the violen

walen

am at this present

'table to say nothing

2 lot of

whereI camtator christmas dinnel

Pilgrim Father's.

who

alsc

moan

some pecular 1ds

English sence, nor anything ration-

I want

boat

went

to. Mrs Whit

there. were such appetizing thing

concerning the observance or Christ-

as roast beef roast turkeys,

TuSC

Christmas Day

qual, phea-

Iymoutn

. 1620,: waS

santus., numerous Dies o,

full of hard work

wells to see Mocame Storers tune-

kinds, cakes, puddings, jellles, jams,

ford said: "The 25th day begane to

the procession.

-nave

dined

With.

AMIS.

Whitwell

apples, nuts, raisins, beaten Disculus

erect the first nous to receive them

corn pone,

home-made wine and

and their goods

Thursday if a

grand

storm

dot of other things wedged

In referring to Christmas at Ply

As she invited me.

 

for of other things wedged la be

tween the big platters.

Dining tables

were real

full-

grown articles of furniture in those

days.

About 20 guests were con-

sidered the right number for Christ-

mas.

And despite the onslaught,

{here was plenty left for the "help"

and considerable to take to the

cabins for husbands and chillun's.

But it must not be imagined for

a moment that the Washingtons

and other prominent families of

that period did nothing on Christ-

mas but eat. The religious phase

of that holiday was always observed

by them in attendance at their

church where they listened to an

appropriate sermon. When Wash-

'Ington was President of the United

States and living in New York he

entered this Christmas note in his

Mournal: "Friday, December 25th.-

Christmas Day-Went to St. Paul's

Chapel in the forenoon. The visitors

to Mrs. Washington this afternoon

byere not numerous, but respectable."

The following record of a Christ-

Sonas spent with the Washingtons at

Mount Vernon, was recorded by a

hado:

"We reached Mount Vernon

the evening before Christmas, and

If anything could have added to our

enjoyment, it was the arrival of

General and Mrs. Pinckney the next

"day, while we were dining. You may

be sure it was a joyful meeting,

and at the very place my wishés

Chad pointed out.

To be in the

{company of

many esteemed

Triends, to hear our good General

In referring to Christmas at Ply-

mouth in 1621, the Governor sald:

shall

remember

one passage

more, rather

of

mirth

than

of

walght.

One day called Christmas-

day, the governor called them out

to worke (as was usual), but the

most of this new-company excused

themselves and sald it went agalnst

their consciences to work on that

day, so the governor told them that

if they made it a matter of con-

science, he would spare them till

they were better informed. So he

led away the rest and left them;

but when they came home at noon

from their work, he found them in

the street at play, openly; some

pitching the barr and some at

stoole-ball, and such like spots.

So

he went to them, and took away

their Implements, and told then

that was against his conscience, that

they should play and others work.

If they made the keeping of it a

matter of devotion, let them keep to

their homes, but there should be no

gaming or revelling in the streets,

Since which time nothing hath been

attempted

that

way,

àt

least

openly."

In New Amsterdam Christmas

was not merely a matter of one

day's festivity.

The celebrations

started several weeks before Christ-

mas Day and continued for three

weeks after that day. From the old

town records of December 14, 1654,

is taken this procedure of the town

council, or city corporation as It

was called:

"As the winter and

THE PASSING OF THE PLUM PUDDING

(Courtesy of, the Metropolitan Museum

of

Art)

not prevented.

As she Invited me.

I saw Mlss Caty Vans at lecture

last evening.

" "Dec. 25th-_Elder Whltwell told

my aunt, that this winter began

as did the winter of 1740. How that

was I don't remember but this I

know, that today is by far the

coldest we have had since I have

been in New England. (N. B. All

run that are abroad.)

"Last Sabbath being rainy

I

went to and from meeting in Mr.

Soley's chase. I dined at Unkle

Winslow's,

the walking be

sO

bad I rode there and back to meet-

ing. Every drop that fell froze, so

that from yesterday morning

to

this time the appearance has, been

similar to last winter. The walk-

ing is so slippery and the air so

cold, that aunt chuses to have me

for her scollar two days.

And

as today is a holiday, so

the

pope

and

his

associates

have

ordained, my aunt thinks not to

trouble Mrs. Smith with me this

week. I began a shift at home yes-

terday for myself, It is pretty for-

ward. I forgot whether I mention-

ed the receipt of Nancy's present.

I am obliged to her for it.

The

Dolphin is still whole.

And like to

remain so.

Big enough for the

Not too big for th

That is the character of ou

tions and facilities. The s

satisfaction are afforded

with his savings as

portion with it

The modest checking acco

ful attention and earns ir

as the account with a ba

The

Washir

and Trust

Central Office:

West End Office:

Resources Over

 

VO

Big enough for the largest corporation;

Not too big for the smallest account

That is the character of our organization, its func-

tions and facilities.

The same service, safety and

satisfaction are

afforded to the small depositor

with

his

savings as to the great cor-

portion with its big account.

The modest checking account gets the same care-

ful attention and earns interest at the same rate

as the. account with a balance in many figures.

The

Washington

Loan

and Trust Company

Central Office: F Street at 9th

West End Office: 17th Street at G

Resources Over Twenty Millions

 

 

VIRGINIA SOUVENIR EDITION

MT. VERNON BOULEVARD TERMINAL

Origin

of George

Washington

Memorial Boulevard, Back in 1886

conceived the idea that the peo-

ple of Virginia

and

the United

States should unite in erecting a

tribute to the memory of the foun-

der of this nation, further bellev-

ing that the most useful, lasting

and beneficial memorial which

could be built to the memory of

Washington, as President, Soldier

and Statesman, would be to link

the city, which he laid out, with

his tomb by a great highway, com-

bining the idea of the Apian Way

at Rome and of London's West-

minster Abbey with brides over

The

various

streams along the

route; Memorials to the great for.

elgn solders who fought to ald the

American

revolutionists.

sectión

for Dach

State

The highway.

witn

section for

each State, will be seventeen miles

in length with a proposed width

of two hundred

and fifty feet,

which Is to be divided into fifty

From

Alexandria

City-Park

Agnew, M. B. Harlow, C. C. Car-

In, W. B. Smoot, J. K. M. Norton,

Hubert Snowden, E. E. Downham,

James R. Caton, W. F. Carne, C. C.

Leadbeater, C. L. Boothe, and J. M.

HIll.

From Alexandria County-Frank

Hume, ex-Senator J. B. Henderson,

Dr. J. B. Tabor Johnson,

A,

B.

Graham, J. E. Clements, and Dr. G,

Wythe Cook.

From Falrfax County-Jos,

Willard, R. W. Moore, W. H. Snow-

den, and Alex J. Wedderburn.

From Washington - Stilson Hutah-

ins, Berlah Wilkins, C, S. Noyes,

W. S. Knox, John Joy Idson, N.

H. Shea, A.

Greenlees, Mathew

Trimble, and F. Mertens.

December

the directors met and

elected, Mr.

wWWm. B.

smoot

(a

son

O

sthetret

president),

first

president, E. E. Downham,

And vIce

president,

and M. B.

Harlow,

sec-

retary and treasurer.

Origintor of Plan

LATE

M.

concelved

the George Washington Memorial

Boulevard.

 

 

 

 

Master Medal Struck

at Philadelphia Mint

First One to Be Made of Platinum

by Government, Presented to

President Hoover

In the presence of distinguished

officials

of

the

United

Government

and

States

invited

guests

the master official medal for the

Celebration of the Two Hundredth

Anniversary

of

the

Birth

of

George

Washington

was

struck

February 4th in platinum at the

United States Mint in Philadel-

phia.

Among those present were Hon.

Robert J. Grant, Director of the

Mint,

Treasury Department; Rep-

resentative

Sol

Bloom,

of

New

York, Associate

Director

of

the

United States George

Washing-

ton

Bicentennial

Commission;

Mrs. Laura Gardin Fraser,

noted

sculptress who designed the medal,

and officials of the

Philadelphia

Mint.

This first medal was pre-

sented to President Hoover,

who

is Chairman of the United States

George

Washington

Bicentennial

Commission.

Within the next

E TAW

" weeks"

of-

ficial medals in

gold, silver

an

THD ALEXANDRIA GAZETTE

bronze will be struck by

the

Mint from the same die for the

Natlonal and state winners in ora-

torical and essay contests which

are being held in schools all over

the country under the auspices of

the United States George Wash-

Ington Bicentennial Commission.

This is the first time a govern-

ment medal has been made

of

platinum.

The platinum for the

master medal, and for a second

medal to be presented to the If-

brary of Congress, has been made

avallable to the Commission prac-

tically without

cost

because

of

the patriotic nature of the Cele-

bration.

Each of these first two

medals will contain as much plat-

inum as 120 wedding rings.

Mrs.

Fraser's design was

ac-

cepted from a number of models

submitted

by

America's leading

sculptosr.

On the obverse

head

of

is

George Washington

and

on the reverse a symbolic fgure

of

Liberty

ana

the

inscription,

"Proclaim Liberty throughout

the

Land."

Mrs. Fraser has designed

many

famous

medals

including

ther

gold medal awarded by

gress

TO

Col.

don-

Charles

A.

Lind-

bergh

and the

John

Marshall

medal for

the American Bar

As-

sociation,

HISTORIC VIRGINIA

BY WATER

Potomac River

to

Chesapeake Bay

Old Point Comfort

Hampton Roads

Norfolk

Modern Steel Steamers Daily 6:30 p. m.

Alexandria 7:00 p. m.

SPECIAL LOW RATES

CHECK YOUR AUTOMOBILE

ONLY $2.00

Any Weight

Any Make

And Drive to

Jamestown Island

- Williamsburg -

• Yorktown

THE SHRINES OF AMERICA

City Ticket Office

Terminals

1423 H Street, N. W.

Foot of Ith St., S. W.

Tel. Dist. 1520

Tel. Dist. 3160

Alexandria

Foot of Prince St.

Norfolk and

Washington

Steamboat Co

 

 

 

Master Medal Struck

at Philadelphia Mint

First One to Be Made of Platinum

by Government, Presented to

President Hoover

In the presence of distinguished

officials

of

the

United

Government

and

States

invited

guests

the master official medal for the

Celebration of the Two Hundredth

Anniversary

of

the

Birth

of

George

Washington

was

struck

February 4th in platinum at the

United States Mint in Philadel-

phia.

Among those present were Hon.

Robert J. Grant, Director of the

Mint,

Treasury Department; Rep-

resentative

Sol

Bloom,

of

New

York, Associate

Director

of

the

United States George

Washing-

ton

Bicentennial

Commission;

Mrs. Laura Gardin Fraser,

noted

sculptress who designed the medal,

and officials of the

Philadelphia

Mint.

This first medal was pre-

sented to President Hoover,

who

is Chairman of the United States

George

Washington

Bicentennial

Commission.

Within the next

E TAW

" weeks"

of-

ficial medals in

gold, silver

an

THD ALEXANDRIA GAZETTE

bronze will be struck by

the

Mint from the same die for the

Natlonal and state winners in ora-

torical and essay contests which

are being held in schools all over

the country under the auspices of

the United States George Wash-

Ington Bicentennial Commission.

This is the first time a govern-

ment medal has been made

of

platinum.

The platinum for the

master medal, and for a second

medal to be presented to the If-

brary of Congress, has been made

avallable to the Commission prac-

tically without

cost

because

of

the patriotic nature of the Cele-

bration.

Each of these first two

medals will contain as much plat-

inum as 120 wedding rings.

Mrs.

Fraser's design was

ac-

cepted from a number of models

submitted

by

America's leading

sculptosr.

On the obverse

head

of

is

George Washington

and

on the reverse a symbolic fgure

of

Liberty

ana

the

inscription,

"Proclaim Liberty throughout

the

Land."

Mrs. Fraser has designed

many

famous

medals

including

ther

gold medal awarded by

gress

TO

Col.

don-

Charles

A.

Lind-

bergh

and the

John

Marshall

medal for

the American Bar

As-

sociation,

HISTORIC VIRGINIA

BY WATER

Potomac River

to

Chesapeake Bay

Old Point Comfort

Hampton Roads

Norfolk

Modern Steel Steamers Daily 6:30 p. m.

Alexandria 7:00 p. m.

SPECIAL LOW RATES

CHECK YOUR AUTOMOBILE

ONLY $2.00

Any Weight

Any Make

And Drive to

Jamestown Island

- Williamsburg -

• Yorktown

THE SHRINES OF AMERICA

City Ticket Office

Terminals

1423 H Street, N. W.

Foot of Ith St., S. W.

Tel. Dist. 1520

Tel. Dist. 3160

Alexandria

Foot of Prince St.

Norfolk and

Washington

Steamboat Co

 

corre

Washington

In his day

it was

Smart

to read...

The Gentleman'

Magazine of

London

Today

it's Smart

to read

THE NEWS

-HOWARD

HERE is a reason for The NEWS being quoted more

often in the Senate and House than any other paper in

the United States. There is a reason for its editorials

(and cartoons) being reprinted more often by national

weeklies and monthlies than any others published in

Washington.

There is a reason for the people--includ-

ing those of every political opinion-saying,

"The News

has the only editorial page in Washington."

Read The News. It has become the Smart Thing to Do.

The Washington Daily News

 

 

 

THE ALEXANDRIA GAZETTE

A STUDY OF OUR FLAG

ITS ORIGIN AND EVOLUTION

Symbol of Liberty and Pat-

riotism Inspiring Pride of

and honor the Far

which is their accredited and ren.

Citizenship in Every

sentativo sym00..

American

davs carrying a

her

and was regarded with superstitious

l0r approprale than

ma present tor bhe

Flag.

li6 origin and evolution

rider Intere

Is not one ol

our possessons

oken

granied: It was not Inherited

but it

ovine rignl

was regard-

Mi As

sone

ruler.

KIng Solomon

man ohs day

we versed Ill DI

caDresse

conviction

Terrible as

MADE or us and

banners.

Todav

of the Flag

Men have dled

consists In

the lovally.

pondinue to

1A

for its glorious an

locomed

Dre.

100

servalon

meI

women behind It.

The Far

descrintion orine solomon s

symbol

and

Independen

onmalned

United States.

ust ever awaken In

hope you like

soldier's fidelity

and endowe

Idea

wan

to the State from each ind-

decrea

noorein.

precions of Individuals so that

ecomes as on. ma

San fre

patriolism, and temperate

ann

discolne

aud all the gunl

wes sonn 800

The Flag Is very much more than

Tribal and Indiaud.

sunda

Of sorts were In use long before the

accomousmen

of mae

written Jan•

sim minin

walel ta ra.

own territory; the bau-

ner by which we know our

our shoe and government

know an enemy rom n friend.

The

balleve

have

been the first people to adopt mill-

standards. Pharoah's

was my caudDed.

unn

having its own standard and sian-

dard-bearer, many of the standards

ToT

victory

A symbOl Is a sien

usuall

and

conched

(colns,

can

think

wiC

NC

beine

OMD.

than the exqusiv

parsing In the baptismal service.

"an outward and visible sign of nu

Inward and spirltual crar

our ar.

then, Is first of all, an

and Fatnolem, Lue two great ideas

VIRGINIA SOUVENIR EDITION

PAGE 1, SEC. B

was Dannes and le-

kends,

and rules had to be formu-

lated for their honorug. Thus be-

fan the

Man Ives

and - moves

unconsciously in

" and

through symbols.

RAd

Schose

the noblest.

walch

ere wor the nIzhest.

the outbreak of the Revolution

some of the colonies used State

blems and other devices, but there

was no general flag representing

them nl

excepl or course, tho Ene.

FIT.

unkorm8. excepo 10

the case of certan Individual mile

colonial

Many of the colonies proceeded

once

adopt flag designs.

these, often for the reement.

some

oficer,

and

theIr

sutches were oblations

stron

heart. The desiens w

humer

accoI

particular sentiment favored Dy

Tammously

main the fas

the upper comer

neurest

one

star a Dine Liet.

that Bunker Hill was fought under

red 1a8,

bearinz the

motto:

"Come.

you

the Government did not fur-

12 0

har use

durine

inA

great strugzle and

were used wore: more or less

less cue lo the lact that there was

lute to Dol the Un.on or stares

together and the Amerioan Fathers

problems

maev

round

do to supply food and trans-

and all Washington could do acoul

Was to asK the Colonels to

color

or such design as might be agrce-

DICI

on two instances recorded where

surg

and strinee

ipcion

the batticfeld.

une

was at the Baltle of, Cowpers

General Andrew Pickens

ommanne.

me

other

Dont

tread

Mrs. Ross and the Flr

Commitee

atutudes, or endless duration.

Her

eve ls exceedinely

r origar and winn.

preserved and suspended

in

the Congress room."

our

eyelids-emblem

She never begins an attack, and she

-embiem of mag.

the 128 known as

rehp

Union." was displaved

on n

Jubery D,

"icore Rex ad

courage.

use never

wounds even

enemies

bertles of America"

side,

and

"NO

Popery

generout

gives them warning not

, tread on her

which

matic of the spirit or the people

who inhabit her country," (the rat-

crosses of Saint George

Andrew

was aIs0 asoye on

the famous Libertv Tree on Boston

omon.

1775

urst.

dIs-

appears apparently weak and

her weapons are for-

rallies are abu

played by Colonel Moultrie

Scor

JAckson

170

oral beauty.

des.d

suntorm

that they can not be asconnecter

Dreakine mem

10 sieces

Moultres commana

shad was

outrie

bla.

Impossibillty

amerIcn

of States

s.age ratue Will

WaS

sound alone. but a ringing

while

feld. wit a

startle the boldest man alve.

center

colonee

Mounn

har

inned aren

other in

resIsu

vrany

Colonel Christopher

uausen.

chin-

bullders at Little Salem with their

pine tree

masts. thai

Carounas

matriots

sociuca inqc

presented to the Contluental Con

sevoral

"an

eezant

standar

enie

bearing on a handsome

neIg

rames

WALD

that a,

EBunker

HIll

sandards

various

device

•erg use

staled that the americans disar

tus or-

dered

WILD

the

George, the ground being blue and

30

thirteen stripes, Alternately red

and white: that the Union be thir-

leen stars, white In A

"blue feld.

representing a new constellation

gun

include a lyre,

arouped.

as symbolIzing

the constel-

sure

stands for harmony.

There

nothing

about

t019

FlaR

perfect. and beautiful

and the result the nearest in

Dav.

Ity o' the Republlc idea.

The blue

sheld

was maren from

Covenan.

expressive of the league and cove-

ance and perseverance and Juscice.

circle, symoolizing the perpetuity

.. wie cIrci

10 51900

The 8X-pointed star.

eternity.

which

aesm

commosed

two pyramids

Explan sIgn

eternity the Dya'

mid-triangle having ncther DekIn•

nine

and

also denoun.

changed to the fve-polnted star as

resue

la line the

showed the subordinatton of

thA

Union

and the dependence of

sutes

each other.

The three

other whe

while for purity, the blue for truth

the sense of Justice),

and the

red beins the color of deflance

ing-the stimulating, primitive, life

blood of humanity

lariye,

has called the lag of

"the divide

1031

duty, ol

heroic dan. u frecoon

or touen

realest realties in the world

Among these early

there are

Ane

used by Rhode Island, founded

on her colonial emblem. bearing

UNITEOR DIE

anchor and the sentiment "Hope.

slar8 On

blue field.

aa 1s

frst flag bearing"the unit, thirtren

nas

used oy (0

Philadelphia

ITOOD

The

malesn

Sweats dorse had In

design

Franklin

(nreen

with thirteen cords.

canton thirteen horizontal blue and

accorn

unn

tonal religious belief.

Inscribes

standards.

engann.

fren

record

drums.

motto

ratan.

400

who transplanted us

Sixth Century,

when St. AugUsunG

wIl

Maccashcota

and

preach

her emblemadonaso le Dune a chul

earliest crusaders camo in Droces-

canterouy.

been

Englah flar

mnem

When

the colonies began lo

Man

raucous conicanceo

fag

SaI

ouserved in cosan

unjust, nags that expressed

Rhenever 2 regiment

receivee

One

recA

their precervalon

an

the pleture of

HAlu

san

ere were uny

o inas or the colonies.

molo

United.

CAl

TUnA

and

sandin

men

dente canddared

a0 sCrpenL

Used

wasn

essie i i spse si s. sip siesie sipsp sie sip sip si s sfe siesie sp sip spafesiesip

The Liberty Flag of 1775.

Thererse

side a

stance

the Battle of

Guilford

Court

While

we.C

composed of stars and stripes. ther

in arrangemenu.

One ha0

rega

stars

stripes,

circle and

center

a due grouna

Wale

the

other far had red and blue stripes

thirteen

blue

elght-pointed

stars on a white

or

al these lags, the one that

«noun 18 clad

various y

the Grand

von.

striped Union, and the Cambridge

fat.

Il apparently received the ap.

probation

of General Washington

for It was lying from the flagsta

Cambridge,

sire had

cine

thirteen horizontal red

ote.

and

thc Union Jack or the

Kingdom of Great Britaln

The oriein of this fax 1s

unknown

Over two yeurs.

WAS

heard around the world

ured.

And

bear altar

Dranrakon

Independence,

Constess

OMLILY.

Pine Tree Flar

S Banker

Unholder" for years and

was a mayo

the gentry.

l6 Was Who suggested the five-polnt

gentlemen

easy way, by fo.dine

square on paper In hall and then

mre an

1 m071

snlp vital her sciscors turned out

a Derfect star. Mr.

Ross was given

coe

the

Government, which the held for

number ol vears,

She

later mar-

red

Claypoole,

and

at her

death. the

descender

her daughter, Clarksn.

This young

ana

Society

Friends and renounced the work of

making Rovernment, Ames.

handiwork should be used in time

or war.

This official Man

Jarst.

furled at the Battle o Saratos

wDen burgoTe WRA captured. Some

400

Increasing number

of stars

and stripes made it expedi-

ent to establisn some regulaton

and

Congress in ApnI of

1818 ordered a return to

the orig-

thirteen stripes, and provided

star should be added for

cach

stale on the July Fourta

following

amne

This

Toreter

FIas

AO

the atreet, there comed

A blare of bueles.

rime

And loyal hearts are beatina

high:

Hats of

The Flar

•passing byl

Usura

South

Carolina

The

aral

national standard. the pattern

millions

CavA

made since. Is beliered to have been

under the personal supervision

General Washington.

cul-and-dried proof

that this far

made al

Number 240

ArCT

the lile shon of Betar

but the Durden Of proof

che

Colonel

CELORR

constess.

be more naura, 4

 

 

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We also have many achievements to our credit in the resto-

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Our special creations of artistic craftsmanship in deluxe

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PAGE 8 SEC.

VIRGINIA SOUVENIR EDITION

Electricity and Progress

When George Washington was

made the first President of the United States,

the event marked the beginning of freedom

for a brave nation. A century later, Edison

invented the electrie light. There was no

proud enunciation of human rights, but it

marked the beginning of an even greater

freedom--the freedom of men and women

from drudgery.

Alexandria, n 1789. was a dett dreary t

Tillage at night. Within, of lamps and can-

dles gave unsteady, flickering light. Cooking

was done over a hot fireplace. Outside, only

a few feeble street lamps broke the darkness.

Today, when darkness comes, there is scarcely a city or hamlet in the whole

country that does not boast bright, gleaming lights along its streets and avenues.

Homes, farms and factories have all the light they need at the snap of the switch.

Yet lighting is only one of the wonders of electricity. It cooks and preserves

our food; cleans our homes; runs our factories; lets us communicate with the far

corners of the earth; brings us entertainment from far-away cities; in fact, gives

us power for almost everything but life itself.

We live among comforts, luxuries and conveniences never dreamed of in 1789.

Great generating stations send reliable electric power to us over countless intercon-

nected copper highways, bringing all the manifold blesaings of electricity to rich and

poor alike.

The Virginia Public Service Company is proud to be a part of the country's

great electric industry. Its aim has alwaye been to work for the development of

low-cost electricity so that every home, every farm, every factory and every person

in the territory it serves may thrive and prosper through the benefits of the master

servant--ELECTRICITY,

VIRGINIA

PUBLIC

SERVIGE COMI

HANY

 

 

TE ALEXANDRIA GAZETTE

VIRGINIA SOUVENIR EDITION

PAGE 1, SEC:

THE MASONS MAGNIFICENT TRIBUTE TO GEORGE WASHINGTON

 

George

Washington National Masonic

Al xandria, Virginia

Story of the Conception and Development

of Plans for

This

Splendid Edifice to Be Dedicated

in

May of This Year

WHEN the Thomas Jefferson ele-

ment made Its historic trade

with the Alexander Hamilton

ele-

ment, by which the Federal Capl-

tal was to be located on the Poto-

mac, and Congress

had rattfled

that agreement by Law, Jefferson

wished to see the Capital located

in Alexandria.

He

even Went so

far as to invite Congress to meet

In that city in 1793, but for

one

reason and another the invitation

was not accepted-mainly, however,

because New England and certain

States

of

the

North were irritated

because Pennsylvania had lost

the

Capital after Congress was once on

the point of locating it on the Sus.

quehanna.

With a natural State pride-for

Vireinia was not

only the largest

State in area in the Union in that

day, but also the most influential

-Jefferson,

on a visit to Alexan-

dria some time later, walked all

over the city looking for

a she for

the Capitol bullding, and finally

he chose Shuter's Hill, sometimes

spelled Shooter's.

It was the most elevated spot in

Alexandria, and probably

18 nOw

the highest polnt in the original

District of Columbla.

gets a commanding view

Alex-

andria and the majestic Potomac

as

flows proudly along'

from

Great

Falls

to

the

Chesapeake

Bay: and from it one can look

down on the hills and lowlands of

the present imperial City of

Wash-

ington.

Shuter's Hill would have

been a magnIficent locaton

for

the

Capitol of this great Nation.

But it was not

to be

Genera

Washington vetoed the

proposi-

tion,

and as Conzress had

given

him the authority nos only to ap-

point the Commission to lay out

the Federal City but also the right

to select the

building.

ne exercised doth with

that wisdom

and caution which

characterized all his acts,

He was not unfamiliar with the

Irritating

which

had

sTORn out of the effort to locate

the Federal Oapital, and after the

sonry entered largely into the le

description glen by the travelers

and character of Washington.

He

of

the items they found there

was a member

of the first lodge

most interesting; and they bear

organized in Alexandria, under

record A

the

1800

that the mu-

charter from the. Grand Lodge of

seum was oDen to

the

public

and

Pennsylvania.

When that charter

even then an object

of in-

lapsed, and a new one was granted

terest

comparable to the home of

the

Grand Lodge

of Virginia,

Washington Itself.

romund

Randolph,

the

Grand

However,

the Masons are!

Master,

appointed

Washington

in

charge

of the Museum,

they have

Master of the lodge; and he was

- henn

In charze-or it 1or

long

thereby

elected for

full term,

time, and they will continue

In

serving in all 20 months. When the

charge of it for some time to come.

Federal District was lald out the

Alexandria Lodge had charge

They

are

the best custodians for

of

such an exhibit, and but for them

the ceremonies and laid the cor-

there would be

MAsonIc Na-

nerstone at Jones' Point just be-

tonal Memorial in Alexandra on

low the city.

When the corner-

Shuter's Hill.

stone of the Capitol was laid by

Washington, his lodge acted as his

When the proposition was first

personal guard and took part in

made

to open this exhibit to the

the

public, about 1906, it seems to have

ceremonies, held under

the

auspices of the Grand Lodge

of

been

closed to the public or

for-

Maryland.

The trowel used on that

gotten

by

the

public from 1850

occasion is one of the relics of the

the end of the last century-

-i- wAs

violenty opposed in

the

Alexan-

lodge.

It 15 used now at

great

dria-Washington Lodge.

And me

svents

when

the Masons

have

oDDosers carried the

charge of cornerstone laying.

day.

Finally,

however,

apparent

When Washington returned from

the

Presidency,

mae loote

gave

ever me In Alexandria that the

Museum should be housed

him a great banquet; and when he

in a

dled the Alexandria Lodge

coll-

fireproof building, and a

tion

proposl-

UD

the lodge

to

ducted

the funeral

ceremonies.

bulld a temple in Alexandria from

Two

of his physicians and many

Jora!

subscriptions.

Towards this

of his most Intimate friends were

or some: tari mousan

members of the

lodge.

After his

death, by special dispensation

dollars

collected, and

as the

of

the Grand Lodge, the name of the

matter seemed to drag the lodge

decided

TO

make

lodge

natlon-wide

waS

changed to Alexandrla-

appeal

for

Washington Lodge No.

22,

that

funds.

Happily

this

might forever carry on his name

plan never got beyond the four

walls of the lodge.

as a Mason.

Every

suare and

Territory

in

An insplration

Mr.

the Union is contributing to

this

Charles H.

Callahan, one of une

Memorial, and every Grand Lodge

leading spirits In this movement

is represented

In Its list of mem-

tort has trown into me Masonir

berg.

Although it was started be-

National

Memorial, and

he

put

fore the organization of the Wash-

through the lodge a resolution call-

Ington

Bicentennial

Celebration,

Ing lor Lhe creation or a- memorla!

its dedication in 1932 wlll be one

to

Washington the Mason which

would be erected by the Masons of

of the great events or unal year

of great celebrations.

America.

This was in 1000,

and

the, Memorla! had its start with

Historically

the Memorlal origl-

that resolution. Mr. Callahan was

nated in 1909 with the Alexandria-

elected secretary of the Local Me-

Washington Lodge, which was im-

mortal

Temple

Committee,

bued with the idea that the preci-

and

with some volunteer help be

ous

Washington

relics

it

OWTIS

to work to interest the Masons

chand no

housed in

fireproof

the country In the proposition.

locating it

in a proposed Federal

bullding convenient to all pilgrims,

Dlatr let

that

The Grand Loage

of Virginia

was to. De

aid that it should be

temple

na0 to be

the Natlon by

both Maryland and

enlisted

In its support.

worthy of the name and fame

af

he

did

to

the great

Virginian.

Arst, and this was no easy matter

but finally the authority came and

launched

wich

contro-

Alexandria was

Washington's

the Grand Master lent his august

betweed those Staten, George-

nome lOWI

where

he

transacted

name

TO

(en

warra lle

the

enerorise

with

the

Bob Is mall

man on

me cal

TUM Aer

GEORGE

WASHINGTON NATIONAL MASONIC MEMORIAL

to

the Washlagton

Monta

whleh

was desianed

Milla, the architect who

the Treasury

Bullding

Patent Ofice.

bulkinga

RITT

Washlacea

Bok Ringing Toget

10e 104

an

 

 

 

limits of the proposed ten sqUare

mile district, and both wanted the

Oapital.

Washington

decided

against both, and in tavor

new town, to be lald out between

the two and separate from both.

His sound judgment 1s now

be confirmed by R memorial erect-

ed to his memory which, when

completed, will be one of the most

beautiful monuments on this con-

tinent.

And. as If chance had no

part In It, this monument 1s be-'

ing erected on

Shuter's Hill,

on

the very spot where

Thomas Jet-

ferson proposed to place the Fed-

eral Capitol.

The Masons of the country have

the matter In hand,

It is their

memorlal to Washington, the

Mason.

They have ralsed every

cent of the money the monument

will cast.

It was designed by MA-

sons, and is being bullt by A con-

tracting

Arm

every

member

of

which is a Mason.

The endowment

fund

is being, ralsed by

Masons

from their

ofT ranks,

and

the

Memortal will be a National Ma-

sonic Shrine, the only one in the

country, with headquarters for the

order,

with a memorial room

which to place the priceless Wash-

Ington relics now

owned br the

Alexandria- Washington Lodge

with a lodge room for this chapter.

If It should be asked why the

Masons have done thls and why

this great memorial should com-

memorate Washington As a Mason,

and

further

why, the

Memorin!

BRoud be located nt

Alexandrin,

the

is very simple,

Ma-

Medallion Over Main Entrance.

Seven Feet Across.

tured After the Stone Was Put In Place.

In that day-and where he went to

church, It became a stopping off

place for reverent pilerims on their

war to Mount Vernon.

Ther ris-

Ite Ohrist Church, the Presby-

terian Meeting House, MaJor John

Caribsle's house,

Gadsby's Tavern

and other historic polnts, and they

wanted to visit the Masonte Room

to see the Alexandria Museum, As

the early travelers called it. With

the bullding

of a concrete road

from Washington, through Alexan-

dria to Mount Vernon, this tide of

travel became Increasingly

large,

Just how large Agures will tell.

In

1907

when the Washington

Mu-

seum was first opened to the pub-

He It had only 600 visttors.

Last

year,

1930,

over

one

hundred

thousand persons climbed the long

steps In the Old City Hall and pald

a small fee to see the Washington

relles.

Digressing Just a moment from

the main thread of this narrative,

It would be Interesting

to know

when

and where

by

what

process the

Alexandria-Wnshlng-

ton Lodge first came into posses-

ston of this collection.

This is not

snid in a spirit of criticism at all,

but I have found in numerous old

travel books, some golng back al-

most to the beginning of the Nine-

teenth Century the record of

this

Alexandria

Museum,

MO

called,

which contalned

only

the

priceless

Washington

relics

but

Also a collection of stuffed birds,

collection of flora and fauna of fos-

otls and of many other things then

considered to be of interest.

The

Grand Lodges had representatives

present at the first meeting called

In the Interest of the Memorinl,

in the old Alexandria-Washington

Lodge room In the old City Hall.

There were elghteen men present

on February 22, 1910. Grand Mas-

ter William B. McChesney of Vir-

ginia presided.

The leading spirit

NaS James

R.

Johnson,

Grand

Master of South Carolina,

Every section of the country was

represented in that little group of

earnest men.

New England sent

the Grand Secretary of Vermont

and the Past Grand Master

of

New Hampshire and the Grand

Master of Connecticut: the Middle

States

were represented by dele-

rates

from

Deleware

and

New

Jersey: the Central States by IlI|-

noir and Michigan;

the

Pacific

Coast by Callfornia; and the South

by

Alabama, the District of Co-

lumbla, Georgla, Kentucky, Mary-

land.

South Carolina,

Tennessee,

Texas, Virgina and West Virginia.

General

Thomas

J.

Shyrock,

Grand Master

of Maryland,

was

made President of the Assoclation

which was Immediately formed to

collect funds and erect the

Me.

morial.

The Constitutlon as writ-

bon

by

Mr. Charles H. Callahan

was adopted.

President Thft and his alde, Cap-

tain Archle W. Butt, both Masons,

visited the session during the after-

noon

of its meeting and on belng

"presented from

East."

ame

President

"remained an interested

observer,

of the

work, expressing

gratifcation and pleasure

at De-

ing permitted to be present at such

an

Important functlon, and later

declared with enthuslasm that

ne

had enjoyed every minute

of the

exercises."

This visit was fortu-

nate, for It gave the national seal

of approval to the enterprise.

Mr.

Taft continued till death the stead-

fast and unvarying frend of the

Memorial,

General

Shyrock continued

to

serve as President of the Memorlal

Association until his death In 1917,

and stce then the President has

been Colonel Louis A. Watres, Past

Grand

Master

of Pennsylvania.

This, too, has been a

fortunate

selection,

for the first Alexandria

Lodge was originated on' a charter

insued

by

the

Grand Lodge

o

Pennsylvania, and it has been well

to have a Northern man

head

Od

an

association

that

18

erecting a National Memorial

on

Southern soil to the South's great-

est man, who is also the Nation's

First Man,

Every cent of the four million

dollars the Temple will cost has

come from voluntary subscriplions

from grand lodges and from Indi-

vidual Masons.

From this source

also will come an endowment fund

of a million and a half dollars.

From year to year the annual

meetings of the George Washing-

ton

National Masonic

Memorial

Association at Alexandria, always

on rebruary

22nd, have grown in

attendance.

Beginning with just

eighteen

persons present at the

organization

meeting,

last

year

there were over two hundred; and

every one enthuslastic in his sup-

port of the grand and unique en-

terprise

On the board of directors 1s

This Piece Was Sculp-

New England man, Mr. Melvin M.

Johnson, of Waltham, Massachu-

WILLIAN'S PICTURE OF WASHINGTON

This rare picture of Ceneral Washington In Masonic regalla was palnted

from life by Willams, of Pennsylvanla, In 1794, for Alexandria-Washington

Lodge, No. 22, A. F. & A. MI., of Alexandria, Va., of which Washlngton was

then past master.

setts, who by chance played a ma-

for part in the sclection of the de-

sign which has been carrled out,

In this memorial,

He was on

fishing trip some years ago and

happening to meet a stranger he

began to talk of the Washington

Memorlal. The stranger seemed In-

terested, and maked for more In-

formation about the project, and

the more Mr. Johnson talked the

more the stranger asked questdons.

Finally, the stranger asked 1f a

design had been chosen

or

an

architect

secured. and was

told

that nether the deslen nor

the

architect had been

secured,

but

that the architect, would be

se-

lected at the next meeting

and

that it would be by competition

from destens.

That stranger Was

Mr.

Harvey

Wiley

Corbett

Helme & Corbett, New York archl-

tects.

He designed the

present

Memorial and to hm It has been

a

labor

of love from the begin-

ning, since his design was approved

and his firm engaged as the officlal

architects.

The

original destens

have been changed somewhat, but

the

maID

they

follow

the

sketches first approved.

It

was 1

momentous occasion

when the officers and directors of

the Memorial Assoclation accom-

paled the architects on

an in-

spection of sites for the proposed

Memorial

Shuter's Hill was the

property of the city of Alexandria

and from a distance It seemed to

offer the best advantages for

the

loention of the Memorial.

And

when the party had climbed to its

summit, and the fat

members of

It had recovered thelr wind, there

was but one voice in favor of its

approval.

One is reminded of the record

from Holy Writ, of the joy which

atirred the heart of Joshua

the

son of Nun, when he Arst beheld

the Promised Land which he had

been sent forward by the Lord to

get for the Children

of Israel,

From Shuter's Hill the view in all

driectiona 1s s0

magnificent and

the

moronment

500

historic with

associations

with

Washington's

own Me, that all about it ls a verl-

table Masonic Canaan,

The early. travelers of America,

who had visited Alexandria

eyen

before the Revolutlon were struck

by the location of the city, Arst

called Bel-Haven-(beautiful har-

bor) on the upper Potomac.

They

predicted for it a wonderful com-

merce, and even after the Federal

Clty was begun, some of them, con-

trasting it with Baltimore,

which

it then exceeded in aize,

foretold

Its future as A great seaport

which

would outstrip the Maryland me-

tropolls in size and in commerce.

This idea was not remote from

Washington's own thoughts, for he,

ion.

had hopes

that

Alexandria

mould be the first citv

of

the

South, and as a practical man of

affars he encouraged that idea in

the minds of his friends.

As OlA

own plantation was a veritable hive

of Industry, 'Incorporating

manU-

factures

along with agriculture-

this is one way that he accumu.

lated his

fortune_-he gave

the example to Alexandria of the

only plan by which the city could

develop Into a thriving commun-

ity,

by becoming

a manufacturing

as well as an importing and

porting seaport.

This idea of Alexandria the sea-

port has been most happlly caught

up and carried out in the design

of the Memorial, for it is a copy

of

the anclent

Ziggurat towers,

which were bullt at the entrance

of harbors along the

Mediterra-

nean Sea as lighthouses to guide

the storm-tossed marlnes in their

perilous journeys.

Into the build-

Ing the

architects have

wrought

the classic architecture

of Greece

and Rome with such Adelity and

such

exquisite

taste,

that

this

building, when completed.

one of the most beautiful artistic

creations in America,

comparable

 

S

s0016

S Pisas

Can Acid Al

GEORGE WASHINGTON

NATIONAL MASONIC MEMORIAL

to

the

Washington

Monumont,

which

was designed by Robert

Mills, the architect who designed

the

Treasury Building

and

thie

Patent Offce,

two most beautiful

bulldings

In

Washington,

and

the

Bok Singing Tower In Forida, sald

to be the lovellest work yet wrought

out

by

an

American architect.

Memorial

Anally

"The Mysteries of Washington

City, which he published in 1814,

A catalogue of some of the Wash-

Ington relics, which is the earlest

record of this kind I have been

able to And.

"I visited the Alexandra Mu-

scum over the market house," says

he,

"and among the collection

there I saw the mantle in whlch

George Washington was christen-

ed; his Masonic robes, apron and

gloves; hls pistols, presented to

him by Louis XVI: a model,

In

stone of the Bastlle, presented to

him by the National Assembly of

France; his pack saddle, used In

the Revolutionary War; hls flag,

borne by his body guard in that

war: the Arst British flag captured

In

that

war, called Alpha by

Washington; the last flag taken in

that,war from Cornwallis; LaFay-

ette's flag-blue; Decatur's flag:

Paul Jones' flag, on board the Bon

Homme Richard, in his battle with

the Serapis;

General Morgan's

flag, borne by his Virginia regl-

ment, and

great many

other

relics of Revolutonary times.

Gen-

eral

Washington's letters

tO

the

cotillion party, which used to as-

semble in the house where

am

located

(probably Gadsby's

Tar.

ern), is in the museum,

In

the

letter the General declines to meet

with

them

on

account

of

Mrs.

Washington's age."

From

this

simple

catalog

1t

would seem that this museum was

a

thing apart from the Masonic

Lodge and that it was a collection

made by Virginlans of Revolution-

Ary War rellcs which were identl-

fied with the name and fame of

Virginians.

This collection grew with

the

years and when the fire

came on

the night of May 19, 1871, it was

probably the most considerable of

its kind in America.

On that night

the lodge room being threatened

the relics

Were

removed, but an

Inventory belng taken afterwards

by

the

Masonic

Lodge

it

was

found that the following had been

stolen or were last:

The bler upon, which the remalns

of Washington were borne to the

tomb, and the crepe which floated

from the door of his home to tell

the sad news of his death:

a DLe-

ture of Martha Washington In her

youthful days;

rare

portrait of

Wnshington and one of LaFayette;

Washington's

military

saddle;

Washington's card tables and por-

tong

settee

which once stood

The

hall

of

Mount

Vernon:

Anne Pamela Cunningham

AN APPRECIATION

WETTe the whole United states

is honoring the birth of Gen-

eral Washlngton, we, of South Caro-

llna

snould not

forget

the

part

taken by one of her daughters in

the rescue of Mount Vernon from

the run that threatened it in 1853,

Miss Anne Pamela Cunningham

Was born in Laurens County, S. C

She was the only daughter- of

famlly known for Its wealth and its

hospitallty. She Inherited the fine

qualitles and high ideals that had

marked her family for generations,

The conditions of her Ife seemed

perfect, but as a girl, a fall from

her horse Injured her spine and

made her an invalid for life. In

the effort to find help for her, she

Was taken to Baltimore, where the

doctors gave her little hope.

It

was while Mrs. Cunningham was

returning home after leaving her

daughter

there,

that she passed

Mount Vernon. Distressed by the

condition she saw there, she wrote

her daughter

and suggested the

make the object of her life work

the restoration of this place.

I would Ike you to picture the in-

valid, hopeless of recovery, shy and

unfamillar with business, undertak-

ing this stupendous task.

Never-

theless she accepted the idea with

interest and began to write power-

ful letters

to

the

"Women

of

America,

signed

"A

Southern

Matron.

When she was able to

travel, she came to Charleston and

Interested

group

of influential

people, who formed a society, and

worked with such enthuslasm that

the first public

subscription Waa

ralsed here.

The

distinguished

lawyer,

James

L.

Petigru,

WEA

among them; and he later drew up

a constitution, which 1s a protec.

tion to the Association today.

It would take much too long

time to tell of the many vicissi-

tudes through which Ms Cunning-

ham passed--among them being the

change in mind of Mr. Washlng-

ton

to sell the place, Just when the

$200,000 necessary seemed la alght.

She went to Mount Vernon, travel-

Ing most of the way on a pot, and

found there a mortified and disap-

pointed man,

He had offered the

estate to

both

Virginla and the

United -States and each had de-

clined to buy, and Mr. Washington

refused

to sell to

lesser Dower.

By R hAppy chance, Miss Cunninz-

ham missed the returning boat

and

obliged

TO

spend the night

 

 

 

will be one of the wonders of this

colntry.

There are nine boors to lhe

monument, the top one being the

observalion tower from which the

visitor will get such a Mew

of

Wealington and the Potomac re

tian as can be seen from no other

vantago polat. On the eighth floor

will be the museum which will

house the Washington rellcs and

other

manorabllia

whlch

the

Alerandris-Washington Lodge now

The Masonlc and Historie

Lilbrery will be on the slith floor,

and the fourth floor

will contaln

the Stater bemortal Hall to which

The States which hare made this

Memorlal possible will place such

rooards,

statutes.

pictures

and

momentoes an they are il

On the second floor, wilh

its

Test Corinthian columns

the

Ceorke Wrahlngton Mlemorial Hall,

100 lest br 66 feet wide and 11

foot hich.

A large

niche for

herale

statue

of

Washington

provided and the walls will can-

taln mural palolings which

wal

picture the story of his Ille.

Back

of •this memorial hall is the ain-

pal-thester, and on ether side of 16

lodge roame.

One of the unque

features will ba the Replica Lodge.

an exact copy of the lodge room in

Alexandria in Tihich Waahington's

own lodgo met after bla death.

The administration

offices

with

an usembly room and back of that

another large amphitheatre capa-

ble of seating one thousand per-

sons will occupy the Arst floor.

of

course

all the

entrances to

the

Memarlal are on this floor,

Caleb Attrater,

who

RAS

an In-

dan agent during Old Hickory's

torm and after then an editor

in

Ohlo and quite

a character,

too,

has recorded in one of his books,

matto:

"nerno me impune laces

sit;" the lag of Washiertan's I'e

guard Idloce 1933 recovered with

tow other fags); the far used by

John Paul Janes

the

Bon

Homme Richard; the model of the

Art French rulliotine;•

boat of

John Paul Jana, which was are

sented to Wushington bor La

Far.

elte and adorned the dining roomn

of Mount Vernon; one of the can-

dies used at the miss before

the

execution of loul XVI:

orOM

made of a chousand pleces of wood,

wilhout mall, per or tlue: a saddle

of olmson velch heavly ambrold-

ered with gold. sent as

a present

to Thoms Jefferson by the Dey

of Morocco: the clothes of Trour-

sch, covering the llle-size Agure

al

the great Indian chief, killed

ba

Oolonel Rkchard M. Johason,

or

Kentucky,

al

the battle

of

the

Thame in 1014; and tha model or

corn

planter

invented

by

Georro

Wrablagton Parte Ousti

La

1790,

Orowded into the dark and diery

old lodge room the relics that have

been preserved are shown to poor

avantage, bit they are among the

mast precious memortals of a great

man

and a great are and hly reat

Irlenda.

Two portalts done by Bir

Joshua

Reynolds hang

on

thos

walls, but the prlse af all the relica

ls the Willing portralt of Wash-

Instan, kept in a

steel

and

guarded night and day.

It

wHA

executed in 1793 by a Phaladalphis

artist who had a commission from

the Alexandria Lode to palnt the

General

"as he t.

Washingtan

approved the panting after it wan

Anishod.

For tuls rare portralt the

Alet-

andris- Washington Lodge has

fused one hundred thousand dal-

decided to let her buy Mount

non.

I will nod dwell on the many dif

foulder the had to ratler tha

moors or the loyal support of he

deroled friend.

she Immedtely

farmed the "Ladler Mount Vernon

Amociation of the Unlon." of which

she wu the fril Repeat.

It u

not long after the Amociation on

formed that the Was of 'Id bega

Reverses of every sort came to Mias

Cunnincham, and for four rear can

could not put to Mown Vernon, but

falthie hands kept Chiog golns,

and she raumed her dutle

and

remonined the reveat untl 1874

Today we of the Anuclation toe

each May,

find trary pondbly

Artangerteat made for our comfort

Not to la the aid days- worm

took their needle with them.

The

sewed and olenned and repalred un

old draperles and the beoken nor

niture: they fare the bast they bad

and spent weak vorking for Wis

restoration of the Mansion,

In Miu

Cunningham' solaridd

farewell address,

dated

June

la

1874, whioh la read at the begin-

ding of each Counci, ahe say:

"Ladies, the home of Wroblor-

too la in your charre

To m

you kenp it the hooe of Whating.

ton.

Let no utererent

bandy

change it; no vandal hands dese

orate it with the fingers of prog

retr

Those who so to the barne

to which he Hred and died wid

to see la what he lived and died

Lat and apot tu thta graad cous-

try be saved froce change.

Upon

you rest the duty."

buch is the charge

that t

Regent and Vice- Regenta of the

Mount Vernon Ladies Associadad

try to keep

Milan Cunningham died in

Group of Relics.

Containing Washington' Masonic Apron worn by him in laying cornerstone of the Nation'

Capital; Washington' Wedding Gloves, Army Spurs, Prunior Kolle and Many Olber

 

 

 

TE ALEXANDRIA GAZETTE

VIRGINIA SOUVENIR EDITION

PAGE 1, SEC:

THE MASONS MAGNIFICENT TRIBUTE TO GEORGE WASHINGTON

 

George

Washington National Masonic

Al xandria, Virginia

Story of the Conception and Development

of Plans for

This

Splendid Edifice to Be Dedicated

in

May of This Year

WHEN the Thomas Jefferson ele-

ment made Its historic trade

with the Alexander Hamilton

ele-

ment, by which the Federal Capl-

tal was to be located on the Poto-

mac, and Congress

had rattfled

that agreement by Law, Jefferson

wished to see the Capital located

in Alexandria.

He

even Went so

far as to invite Congress to meet

In that city in 1793, but for

one

reason and another the invitation

was not accepted-mainly, however,

because New England and certain

States

of

the

North were irritated

because Pennsylvania had lost

the

Capital after Congress was once on

the point of locating it on the Sus.

quehanna.

With a natural State pride-for

Vireinia was not

only the largest

State in area in the Union in that

day, but also the most influential

-Jefferson,

on a visit to Alexan-

dria some time later, walked all

over the city looking for

a she for

the Capitol bullding, and finally

he chose Shuter's Hill, sometimes

spelled Shooter's.

It was the most elevated spot in

Alexandria, and probably

18 nOw

the highest polnt in the original

District of Columbla.

gets a commanding view

Alex-

andria and the majestic Potomac

as

flows proudly along'

from

Great

Falls

to

the

Chesapeake

Bay: and from it one can look

down on the hills and lowlands of

the present imperial City of

Wash-

ington.

Shuter's Hill would have

been a magnIficent locaton

for

the

Capitol of this great Nation.

But it was not

to be

Genera

Washington vetoed the

proposi-

tion,

and as Conzress had

given

him the authority nos only to ap-

point the Commission to lay out

the Federal City but also the right

to select the

building.

ne exercised doth with

that wisdom

and caution which

characterized all his acts,

He was not unfamiliar with the

Irritating

which

had

sTORn out of the effort to locate

the Federal Oapital, and after the

sonry entered largely into the le

description glen by the travelers

and character of Washington.

He

of

the items they found there

was a member

of the first lodge

most interesting; and they bear

organized in Alexandria, under

record A

the

1800

that the mu-

charter from the. Grand Lodge of

seum was oDen to

the

public

and

Pennsylvania.

When that charter

even then an object

of in-

lapsed, and a new one was granted

terest

comparable to the home of

the

Grand Lodge

of Virginia,

Washington Itself.

romund

Randolph,

the

Grand

However,

the Masons are!

Master,

appointed

Washington

in

charge

of the Museum,

they have

Master of the lodge; and he was

- henn

In charze-or it 1or

long

thereby

elected for

full term,

time, and they will continue

In

serving in all 20 months. When the

charge of it for some time to come.

Federal District was lald out the

Alexandria Lodge had charge

They

are

the best custodians for

of

such an exhibit, and but for them

the ceremonies and laid the cor-

there would be

MAsonIc Na-

nerstone at Jones' Point just be-

tonal Memorial in Alexandra on

low the city.

When the corner-

Shuter's Hill.

stone of the Capitol was laid by

Washington, his lodge acted as his

When the proposition was first

personal guard and took part in

made

to open this exhibit to the

the

public, about 1906, it seems to have

ceremonies, held under

the

auspices of the Grand Lodge

of

been

closed to the public or

for-

Maryland.

The trowel used on that

gotten

by

the

public from 1850

occasion is one of the relics of the

the end of the last century-

-i- wAs

violenty opposed in

the

Alexan-

lodge.

It 15 used now at

great

dria-Washington Lodge.

And me

svents

when

the Masons

have

oDDosers carried the

charge of cornerstone laying.

day.

Finally,

however,

apparent

When Washington returned from

the

Presidency,

mae loote

gave

ever me In Alexandria that the

Museum should be housed

him a great banquet; and when he

in a

dled the Alexandria Lodge

coll-

fireproof building, and a

tion

proposl-

UD

the lodge

to

ducted

the funeral

ceremonies.

bulld a temple in Alexandria from

Two

of his physicians and many

Jora!

subscriptions.

Towards this

of his most Intimate friends were

or some: tari mousan

members of the

lodge.

After his

death, by special dispensation

dollars

collected, and

as the

of

the Grand Lodge, the name of the

matter seemed to drag the lodge

decided

TO

make

lodge

natlon-wide

waS

changed to Alexandrla-

appeal

for

Washington Lodge No.

22,

that

funds.

Happily

this

might forever carry on his name

plan never got beyond the four

walls of the lodge.

as a Mason.

Every

suare and

Territory

in

An insplration

Mr.

the Union is contributing to

this

Charles H.

Callahan, one of une

Memorial, and every Grand Lodge

leading spirits In this movement

is represented

In Its list of mem-

tort has trown into me Masonir

berg.

Although it was started be-

National

Memorial, and

he

put

fore the organization of the Wash-

through the lodge a resolution call-

Ington

Bicentennial

Celebration,

Ing lor Lhe creation or a- memorla!

its dedication in 1932 wlll be one

to

Washington the Mason which

would be erected by the Masons of

of the great events or unal year

of great celebrations.

America.

This was in 1000,

and

the, Memorla! had its start with

Historically

the Memorlal origl-

that resolution. Mr. Callahan was

nated in 1909 with the Alexandria-

elected secretary of the Local Me-

Washington Lodge, which was im-

mortal

Temple

Committee,

bued with the idea that the preci-

and

with some volunteer help be

ous

Washington

relics

it

OWTIS

to work to interest the Masons

chand no

housed in

fireproof

the country In the proposition.

locating it

in a proposed Federal

bullding convenient to all pilgrims,

Dlatr let

that

The Grand Loage

of Virginia

was to. De

aid that it should be

temple

na0 to be

the Natlon by

both Maryland and

enlisted

In its support.

worthy of the name and fame

af

he

did

to

the great

Virginian.

Arst, and this was no easy matter

but finally the authority came and

launched

wich

contro-

Alexandria was

Washington's

the Grand Master lent his august

betweed those Staten, George-

nome lOWI

where

he

transacted

name

TO

(en

warra lle

the

enerorise

with

the

Bob Is mall

man on

me cal

TUM Aer

GEORGE

WASHINGTON NATIONAL MASONIC MEMORIAL

to

the Washlagton

Monta

whleh

was desianed

Milla, the architect who

the Treasury

Bullding

Patent Ofice.

bulkinga

RITT

Washlacea

Bok Ringing Toget

10e 104

an

 

 

 

limits of the proposed ten sqUare

mile district, and both wanted the

Oapital.

Washington

decided

against both, and in tavor

new town, to be lald out between

the two and separate from both.

His sound judgment 1s now

be confirmed by R memorial erect-

ed to his memory which, when

completed, will be one of the most

beautiful monuments on this con-

tinent.

And. as If chance had no

part In It, this monument 1s be-'

ing erected on

Shuter's Hill,

on

the very spot where

Thomas Jet-

ferson proposed to place the Fed-

eral Capitol.

The Masons of the country have

the matter In hand,

It is their

memorlal to Washington, the

Mason.

They have ralsed every

cent of the money the monument

will cast.

It was designed by MA-

sons, and is being bullt by A con-

tracting

Arm

every

member

of

which is a Mason.

The endowment

fund

is being, ralsed by

Masons

from their

ofT ranks,

and

the

Memortal will be a National Ma-

sonic Shrine, the only one in the

country, with headquarters for the

order,

with a memorial room

which to place the priceless Wash-

Ington relics now

owned br the

Alexandria- Washington Lodge

with a lodge room for this chapter.

If It should be asked why the

Masons have done thls and why

this great memorial should com-

memorate Washington As a Mason,

and

further

why, the

Memorin!

BRoud be located nt

Alexandrin,

the

is very simple,

Ma-

Medallion Over Main Entrance.

Seven Feet Across.

tured After the Stone Was Put In Place.

In that day-and where he went to

church, It became a stopping off

place for reverent pilerims on their

war to Mount Vernon.

Ther ris-

Ite Ohrist Church, the Presby-

terian Meeting House, MaJor John

Caribsle's house,

Gadsby's Tavern

and other historic polnts, and they

wanted to visit the Masonte Room

to see the Alexandria Museum, As

the early travelers called it. With

the bullding

of a concrete road

from Washington, through Alexan-

dria to Mount Vernon, this tide of

travel became Increasingly

large,

Just how large Agures will tell.

In

1907

when the Washington

Mu-

seum was first opened to the pub-

He It had only 600 visttors.

Last

year,

1930,

over

one

hundred

thousand persons climbed the long

steps In the Old City Hall and pald

a small fee to see the Washington

relles.

Digressing Just a moment from

the main thread of this narrative,

It would be Interesting

to know

when

and where

by

what

process the

Alexandria-Wnshlng-

ton Lodge first came into posses-

ston of this collection.

This is not

snid in a spirit of criticism at all,

but I have found in numerous old

travel books, some golng back al-

most to the beginning of the Nine-

teenth Century the record of

this

Alexandria

Museum,

MO

called,

which contalned

only

the

priceless

Washington

relics

but

Also a collection of stuffed birds,

collection of flora and fauna of fos-

otls and of many other things then

considered to be of interest.

The

Grand Lodges had representatives

present at the first meeting called

In the Interest of the Memorinl,

in the old Alexandria-Washington

Lodge room In the old City Hall.

There were elghteen men present

on February 22, 1910. Grand Mas-

ter William B. McChesney of Vir-

ginia presided.

The leading spirit

NaS James

R.

Johnson,

Grand

Master of South Carolina,

Every section of the country was

represented in that little group of

earnest men.

New England sent

the Grand Secretary of Vermont

and the Past Grand Master

of

New Hampshire and the Grand

Master of Connecticut: the Middle

States

were represented by dele-

rates

from

Deleware

and

New

Jersey: the Central States by IlI|-

noir and Michigan;

the

Pacific

Coast by Callfornia; and the South

by

Alabama, the District of Co-

lumbla, Georgla, Kentucky, Mary-

land.

South Carolina,

Tennessee,

Texas, Virgina and West Virginia.

General

Thomas

J.

Shyrock,

Grand Master

of Maryland,

was

made President of the Assoclation

which was Immediately formed to

collect funds and erect the

Me.

morial.

The Constitutlon as writ-

bon

by

Mr. Charles H. Callahan

was adopted.

President Thft and his alde, Cap-

tain Archle W. Butt, both Masons,

visited the session during the after-

noon

of its meeting and on belng

"presented from

East."

ame

President

"remained an interested

observer,

of the

work, expressing

gratifcation and pleasure

at De-

ing permitted to be present at such

an

Important functlon, and later

declared with enthuslasm that

ne

had enjoyed every minute

of the

exercises."

This visit was fortu-

nate, for It gave the national seal

of approval to the enterprise.

Mr.

Taft continued till death the stead-

fast and unvarying frend of the

Memorial,

General

Shyrock continued

to

serve as President of the Memorlal

Association until his death In 1917,

and stce then the President has

been Colonel Louis A. Watres, Past

Grand

Master

of Pennsylvania.

This, too, has been a

fortunate

selection,

for the first Alexandria

Lodge was originated on' a charter

insued

by

the

Grand Lodge

o

Pennsylvania, and it has been well

to have a Northern man

head

Od

an

association

that

18

erecting a National Memorial

on

Southern soil to the South's great-

est man, who is also the Nation's

First Man,

Every cent of the four million

dollars the Temple will cost has

come from voluntary subscriplions

from grand lodges and from Indi-

vidual Masons.

From this source

also will come an endowment fund

of a million and a half dollars.

From year to year the annual

meetings of the George Washing-

ton

National Masonic

Memorial

Association at Alexandria, always

on rebruary

22nd, have grown in

attendance.

Beginning with just

eighteen

persons present at the

organization

meeting,

last

year

there were over two hundred; and

every one enthuslastic in his sup-

port of the grand and unique en-

terprise

On the board of directors 1s

This Piece Was Sculp-

New England man, Mr. Melvin M.

Johnson, of Waltham, Massachu-

WILLIAN'S PICTURE OF WASHINGTON

This rare picture of Ceneral Washington In Masonic regalla was palnted

from life by Willams, of Pennsylvanla, In 1794, for Alexandria-Washington

Lodge, No. 22, A. F. & A. MI., of Alexandria, Va., of which Washlngton was

then past master.

setts, who by chance played a ma-

for part in the sclection of the de-

sign which has been carrled out,

In this memorial,

He was on

fishing trip some years ago and

happening to meet a stranger he

began to talk of the Washington

Memorlal. The stranger seemed In-

terested, and maked for more In-

formation about the project, and

the more Mr. Johnson talked the

more the stranger asked questdons.

Finally, the stranger asked 1f a

design had been chosen

or

an

architect

secured. and was

told

that nether the deslen nor

the

architect had been

secured,

but

that the architect, would be

se-

lected at the next meeting

and

that it would be by competition

from destens.

That stranger Was

Mr.

Harvey

Wiley

Corbett

Helme & Corbett, New York archl-

tects.

He designed the

present

Memorial and to hm It has been

a

labor

of love from the begin-

ning, since his design was approved

and his firm engaged as the officlal

architects.

The

original destens

have been changed somewhat, but

the

maID

they

follow

the

sketches first approved.

It

was 1

momentous occasion

when the officers and directors of

the Memorial Assoclation accom-

paled the architects on

an in-

spection of sites for the proposed

Memorial

Shuter's Hill was the

property of the city of Alexandria

and from a distance It seemed to

offer the best advantages for

the

loention of the Memorial.

And

when the party had climbed to its

summit, and the fat

members of

It had recovered thelr wind, there

was but one voice in favor of its

approval.

One is reminded of the record

from Holy Writ, of the joy which

atirred the heart of Joshua

the

son of Nun, when he Arst beheld

the Promised Land which he had

been sent forward by the Lord to

get for the Children

of Israel,

From Shuter's Hill the view in all

driectiona 1s s0

magnificent and

the

moronment

500

historic with

associations

with

Washington's

own Me, that all about it ls a verl-

table Masonic Canaan,

The early. travelers of America,

who had visited Alexandria

eyen

before the Revolutlon were struck

by the location of the city, Arst

called Bel-Haven-(beautiful har-

bor) on the upper Potomac.

They

predicted for it a wonderful com-

merce, and even after the Federal

Clty was begun, some of them, con-

trasting it with Baltimore,

which

it then exceeded in aize,

foretold

Its future as A great seaport

which

would outstrip the Maryland me-

tropolls in size and in commerce.

This idea was not remote from

Washington's own thoughts, for he,

ion.

had hopes

that

Alexandria

mould be the first citv

of

the

South, and as a practical man of

affars he encouraged that idea in

the minds of his friends.

As OlA

own plantation was a veritable hive

of Industry, 'Incorporating

manU-

factures

along with agriculture-

this is one way that he accumu.

lated his

fortune_-he gave

the example to Alexandria of the

only plan by which the city could

develop Into a thriving commun-

ity,

by becoming

a manufacturing

as well as an importing and

porting seaport.

This idea of Alexandria the sea-

port has been most happlly caught

up and carried out in the design

of the Memorial, for it is a copy

of

the anclent

Ziggurat towers,

which were bullt at the entrance

of harbors along the

Mediterra-

nean Sea as lighthouses to guide

the storm-tossed marlnes in their

perilous journeys.

Into the build-

Ing the

architects have

wrought

the classic architecture

of Greece

and Rome with such Adelity and

such

exquisite

taste,

that

this

building, when completed.

one of the most beautiful artistic

creations in America,

comparable

 

S

s0016

S Pisas

Can Acid Al

GEORGE WASHINGTON

NATIONAL MASONIC MEMORIAL

to

the

Washington

Monumont,

which

was designed by Robert

Mills, the architect who designed

the

Treasury Building

and

thie

Patent Offce,

two most beautiful

bulldings

In

Washington,

and

the

Bok Singing Tower In Forida, sald

to be the lovellest work yet wrought

out

by

an

American architect.

Memorial

Anally

"The Mysteries of Washington

City, which he published in 1814,

A catalogue of some of the Wash-

Ington relics, which is the earlest

record of this kind I have been

able to And.

"I visited the Alexandra Mu-

scum over the market house," says

he,

"and among the collection

there I saw the mantle in whlch

George Washington was christen-

ed; his Masonic robes, apron and

gloves; hls pistols, presented to

him by Louis XVI: a model,

In

stone of the Bastlle, presented to

him by the National Assembly of

France; his pack saddle, used In

the Revolutionary War; hls flag,

borne by his body guard in that

war: the Arst British flag captured

In

that

war, called Alpha by

Washington; the last flag taken in

that,war from Cornwallis; LaFay-

ette's flag-blue; Decatur's flag:

Paul Jones' flag, on board the Bon

Homme Richard, in his battle with

the Serapis;

General Morgan's

flag, borne by his Virginia regl-

ment, and

great many

other

relics of Revolutonary times.

Gen-

eral

Washington's letters

tO

the

cotillion party, which used to as-

semble in the house where

am

located

(probably Gadsby's

Tar.

ern), is in the museum,

In

the

letter the General declines to meet

with

them

on

account

of

Mrs.

Washington's age."

From

this

simple

catalog

1t

would seem that this museum was

a

thing apart from the Masonic

Lodge and that it was a collection

made by Virginlans of Revolution-

Ary War rellcs which were identl-

fied with the name and fame of

Virginians.

This collection grew with

the

years and when the fire

came on

the night of May 19, 1871, it was

probably the most considerable of

its kind in America.

On that night

the lodge room being threatened

the relics

Were

removed, but an

Inventory belng taken afterwards

by

the

Masonic

Lodge

it

was

found that the following had been

stolen or were last:

The bler upon, which the remalns

of Washington were borne to the

tomb, and the crepe which floated

from the door of his home to tell

the sad news of his death:

a DLe-

ture of Martha Washington In her

youthful days;

rare

portrait of

Wnshington and one of LaFayette;

Washington's

military

saddle;

Washington's card tables and por-

tong

settee

which once stood

The

hall

of

Mount

Vernon:

Anne Pamela Cunningham

AN APPRECIATION

WETTe the whole United states

is honoring the birth of Gen-

eral Washlngton, we, of South Caro-

llna

snould not

forget

the

part

taken by one of her daughters in

the rescue of Mount Vernon from

the run that threatened it in 1853,

Miss Anne Pamela Cunningham

Was born in Laurens County, S. C

She was the only daughter- of

famlly known for Its wealth and its

hospitallty. She Inherited the fine

qualitles and high ideals that had

marked her family for generations,

The conditions of her Ife seemed

perfect, but as a girl, a fall from

her horse Injured her spine and

made her an invalid for life. In

the effort to find help for her, she

Was taken to Baltimore, where the

doctors gave her little hope.

It

was while Mrs. Cunningham was

returning home after leaving her

daughter

there,

that she passed

Mount Vernon. Distressed by the

condition she saw there, she wrote

her daughter

and suggested the

make the object of her life work

the restoration of this place.

I would Ike you to picture the in-

valid, hopeless of recovery, shy and

unfamillar with business, undertak-

ing this stupendous task.

Never-

theless she accepted the idea with

interest and began to write power-

ful letters

to

the

"Women

of

America,

signed

"A

Southern

Matron.

When she was able to

travel, she came to Charleston and

Interested

group

of influential

people, who formed a society, and

worked with such enthuslasm that

the first public

subscription Waa

ralsed here.

The

distinguished

lawyer,

James

L.

Petigru,

WEA

among them; and he later drew up

a constitution, which 1s a protec.

tion to the Association today.

It would take much too long

time to tell of the many vicissi-

tudes through which Ms Cunning-

ham passed--among them being the

change in mind of Mr. Washlng-

ton

to sell the place, Just when the

$200,000 necessary seemed la alght.

She went to Mount Vernon, travel-

Ing most of the way on a pot, and

found there a mortified and disap-

pointed man,

He had offered the

estate to

both

Virginla and the

United -States and each had de-

clined to buy, and Mr. Washington

refused

to sell to

lesser Dower.

By R hAppy chance, Miss Cunninz-

ham missed the returning boat

and

obliged

TO

spend the night

 

 

 

will be one of the wonders of this

colntry.

There are nine boors to lhe

monument, the top one being the

observalion tower from which the

visitor will get such a Mew

of

Wealington and the Potomac re

tian as can be seen from no other

vantago polat. On the eighth floor

will be the museum which will

house the Washington rellcs and

other

manorabllia

whlch

the

Alerandris-Washington Lodge now

The Masonlc and Historie

Lilbrery will be on the slith floor,

and the fourth floor

will contaln

the Stater bemortal Hall to which

The States which hare made this

Memorlal possible will place such

rooards,

statutes.

pictures

and

momentoes an they are il

On the second floor, wilh

its

Test Corinthian columns

the

Ceorke Wrahlngton Mlemorial Hall,

100 lest br 66 feet wide and 11

foot hich.

A large

niche for

herale

statue

of

Washington

provided and the walls will can-

taln mural palolings which

wal

picture the story of his Ille.

Back

of •this memorial hall is the ain-

pal-thester, and on ether side of 16

lodge roame.

One of the unque

features will ba the Replica Lodge.

an exact copy of the lodge room in

Alexandria in Tihich Waahington's

own lodgo met after bla death.

The administration

offices

with

an usembly room and back of that

another large amphitheatre capa-

ble of seating one thousand per-

sons will occupy the Arst floor.

of

course

all the

entrances to

the

Memarlal are on this floor,

Caleb Attrater,

who

RAS

an In-

dan agent during Old Hickory's

torm and after then an editor

in

Ohlo and quite

a character,

too,

has recorded in one of his books,

matto:

"nerno me impune laces

sit;" the lag of Washiertan's I'e

guard Idloce 1933 recovered with

tow other fags); the far used by

John Paul Janes

the

Bon

Homme Richard; the model of the

Art French rulliotine;•

boat of

John Paul Jana, which was are

sented to Wushington bor La

Far.

elte and adorned the dining roomn

of Mount Vernon; one of the can-

dies used at the miss before

the

execution of loul XVI:

orOM

made of a chousand pleces of wood,

wilhout mall, per or tlue: a saddle

of olmson velch heavly ambrold-

ered with gold. sent as

a present

to Thoms Jefferson by the Dey

of Morocco: the clothes of Trour-

sch, covering the llle-size Agure

al

the great Indian chief, killed

ba

Oolonel Rkchard M. Johason,

or

Kentucky,

al

the battle

of

the

Thame in 1014; and tha model or

corn

planter

invented

by

Georro

Wrablagton Parte Ousti

La

1790,

Orowded into the dark and diery

old lodge room the relics that have

been preserved are shown to poor

avantage, bit they are among the

mast precious memortals of a great

man

and a great are and hly reat

Irlenda.

Two portalts done by Bir

Joshua

Reynolds hang

on

thos

walls, but the prlse af all the relica

ls the Willing portralt of Wash-

Instan, kept in a

steel

and

guarded night and day.

It

wHA

executed in 1793 by a Phaladalphis

artist who had a commission from

the Alexandria Lode to palnt the

General

"as he t.

Washingtan

approved the panting after it wan

Anishod.

For tuls rare portralt the

Alet-

andris- Washington Lodge has

fused one hundred thousand dal-

decided to let her buy Mount

non.

I will nod dwell on the many dif

foulder the had to ratler tha

moors or the loyal support of he

deroled friend.

she Immedtely

farmed the "Ladler Mount Vernon

Amociation of the Unlon." of which

she wu the fril Repeat.

It u

not long after the Amociation on

formed that the Was of 'Id bega

Reverses of every sort came to Mias

Cunnincham, and for four rear can

could not put to Mown Vernon, but

falthie hands kept Chiog golns,

and she raumed her dutle

and

remonined the reveat untl 1874

Today we of the Anuclation toe

each May,

find trary pondbly

Artangerteat made for our comfort

Not to la the aid days- worm

took their needle with them.

The

sewed and olenned and repalred un

old draperles and the beoken nor

niture: they fare the bast they bad

and spent weak vorking for Wis

restoration of the Mansion,

In Miu

Cunningham' solaridd

farewell address,

dated

June

la

1874, whioh la read at the begin-

ding of each Counci, ahe say:

"Ladies, the home of Wroblor-

too la in your charre

To m

you kenp it the hooe of Whating.

ton.

Let no utererent

bandy

change it; no vandal hands dese

orate it with the fingers of prog

retr

Those who so to the barne

to which he Hred and died wid

to see la what he lived and died

Lat and apot tu thta graad cous-

try be saved froce change.

Upon

you rest the duty."

buch is the charge

that t

Regent and Vice- Regenta of the

Mount Vernon Ladies Associadad

try to keep

Milan Cunningham died in

Group of Relics.

Containing Washington' Masonic Apron worn by him in laying cornerstone of the Nation'

Capital; Washington' Wedding Gloves, Army Spurs, Prunior Kolle and Many Olber

 

 

Min-

Otaerine

Ana

32709

son.

Mandarila

gant three story Brick House

restoraDo

romane

"Indenture

berween

Jonn

MOTO

dollars, property

preservation or Mount Veron:

bullding

tne

end of

Washineton

Market House which

the

Ralnmore,

Kine

and Water Streets. and

omars-des les rvsel

nave

mar Min VA

Sout

917 King St.

Phone 761

rote brethrer

MaverD

&

has

lane

ene

January l6th, 1813, they

" EA

wondered

can

indO

TOINS DAXS

conmodious.

furnisha

cInd

200

John

Aletan.

same

SIVA

Chronon

rA

tha°

far.off Invald

a13,

rejeasing

Gadsy

rooms in it

KOON

terms

e8s0

of 1802:

the evangelsh

nopes

October

22d,

an0

1211,

wisa ease

enn

same

Thoma:

ToAD

June 24th•

1485

the lodge

mei

SUIT

IN

CHANCERY

oded

WASHINGTON KEPT IN TOUCH

this It

and on

appears that

the start of this

aru

Gadebr

Alex.

anners

Trien

In mind merely

andria

September

where John

Wise knot.

annarenv.

CAnA

on that nistorio

as los

charity sermon

11683

Cuv Tavern

WITH HOME

Aril of that year

an - December

Cameron Streets

defondoni

standing there

chancen

complished he

ana

had not apeared in

tha

asiro•

washingto

Inuie

future history of

Joan

the

WASHINGTON had

Portio

(and

Taverns)

Intrinia

crowninz victory of the revolutica

fles

sanctsains' him

Accondont

Surrounded bu

he

Aleyan-

Tohn

WISE

MavAm

Advertiser--venerable

piANtE

DarAn.

Camar

hie. hande

halonsino

have

Rosatis

that he was keening tavern

Jonn

enA

Gadsov

Dre.

unden

where

fro vogre

Tha

"he Ctv Tavern'

holdine

farah

Stages

18467

Gadsby's),

that cha

alone and on foot, sought the home of Many

9A11

Ma=

AM throuch the strenuous rear: clinalo

amalen he had kent in as closa touch al

Ab

GRAPES TAVERN

orio- to 1788 took

ratan

Tada al

different

Marrland"

Tandlard

mit

lara

-Imas he ouned or

- TAMITA

1 nAA

youth and round manhood

Alemndrians

periods. other

years

comselor and hla laminim

evenina

Adarimall- lé: stands todar. Droo-

snat

nour o

Phras

TIl

take place pre.

high,

Fai-

•ha

REMEMBER

the

-hoes ef

gatherine

shorelass

fronting on Falrfax, imme-

Chor

flounnaslo

Talen

Phant

VALLEY FORGE

and Cameron:

TOl

Tash

and

In HI

lana

Din Berta

asA

Ragged, hungry, half-frozen, leav-

City Taver In 1792.

ing a trail of blood along their snow

marches, those men at Valley Forge

HURSHY'S

RESTAURANT

Famous Historieal Incation

fought through, and won. Do we

for whom they fought dare to com-

plain? Do we, with our glorious in-

heritance, dare to speak of

shard

oR ARIET

times?"

If we are worthy sons of

our forefathers. if we possess a ves-

tige of the spirit that prevailed at

Valley Forge, we, too, shall fight

Twirien of Msxandra 1754 m 1787 Mason first proclatmed the

through and win. Then, and then

-ten ratana n the states

Cored ltution o/ Virginta

«The Fir- Ohnafiution o a Frea

State"

117787

only, shall we be true Americans.

WASHINGTON was America's

It is easy to keep in touch today

first advocate of the develop-

-no matter how far from family

ment of communication as a factor

and friends or how strenuous your

in assuring national solidarity. activities. One of the swiftest and

Across the years his words of nearly

surest ways-

_and the most intimate

a century and a half ago ring as true

and personal-

-is afforded by the

as

if thev were uttered todav:

telephones of the Bell System.

"OPEN ALL THE COMMUNICA-

Let the telephone keep the im-

TIONS... ENCOURAGE THE USE

portant ties of your life unbroken. It

OF THEM TO THE UTMOST

will cost you little and give you much.

Make station to-station calls and you fan talk

25 miles for 25 cents,'

"50 milas

275 miles

for 75 cents, and 400 miles for $1.00.

after 8+30 P. M. Dav rates are clichtly hipher.

FRECTED AY TEE ALEYINDELA

t

+

Then Come in for a Delichtful Meal or Refreshing

Drink at Our Fountain

King and Rovel Ste.

Alexandria,

Va.

R. E. Knight & Sons

621 King St.

Phone 41

THE CHESAPEAKE AND POTOMAC TELEPHONE CO.

NOTHING GIVES SO MUCH

FOR SO LITTLE

OF VIRGINIA

(Bell Sustem)

 

 

 

PAGE 6. SEC.

C

FAMOUS GADSBY'S TAVERN

CIT

Historic Tavern

.. Played a Big Part

in Colonial History

Eamous Gadsby's Tavern was Erected

in 1452•

Is Being nestored:

leems

History

MUCH Interest

centers

GadsOv's

Tavern

old

the

enterprising local

American Legion

Posts began

their

to re-

store

and

this

notable

landmark

made tamous

by

close

association

with

Washington

and

other personaces when the tavern

enjoyed its heydey

of popularity.

Few if anv. of the ancient, inns

played a

more important part

early

American

nistorv.

After

years

of

neglect

the

Dace

again come into the limelieht

and

be

once

again

nonuar

rendezvous.

Varlous local organi-

zations will aid the Legion in this

worthwhile

task.

Legionnaries

will have headquar

ters and

recreamon center in the

ravenn

membere

cuLC

descendants

of

Long

ago

MaOSA

life

with

the

local

militia

contaran

in

and

around

this

historic building,

OV

war

veterans.

who

before

drilled

the

tavern before marching

off to

warS

The

tWO

bulldings compose

what

commonly

called

The

"Gadsby's.

Dist Out W 15? b618

*oronze

memorial

tablet

which

reads

"WASHINGTON'S

(Old

HEADQUARTERS

City Tavern)

Here

Washlneton recruited his

Arst

commana or drovincial troons

in

Great Meadows campaign

In

1754.

this

house he:

was quarter-

ed

when

he recelved his commis-

sIOn

Major

Genera..

dock S

staI

The

celebration

the

Federal

constiusion

took

DaGo

•here June

28,

1788.

the

Colonial

Dames

America

111

the

Vir-

finla

GADSBY'S

There it dreams-wrapped in the dust of centuries,

The old tavern, Gadsby's hostelry,

A silent memorial of the passing procession

Of long lost years' celebrities.

There it dreams--behind dark ramparts of old walls,

Crumbling walls, dusty walls;

Resounding with echoes of forgotten times,

Forgotten toasts, mingled with

The metallic clinking of old goblets.

Toasts-words-words that clung as the old cobwebs,

Words that seered the very souls of men.

Words of Washington,

That last sad order to his "Independent Blues"

Indelibly stamped on the old worn steps.

Words of Lafayette,

Gay words, inspired by old Madeira,

Culminated by a fill of

"canvas backs."

Words- glorious words!

of a

gala glorious occasion!

The first celebration of the adoption of the Constitution.

Words-

-sad pathetic words,

The dying words of a "female stranger,"

Secreted, embedded in these old, crumbling walls.

Words--musical, romantic words.

Whispered to the soff strains of the minuet,

Danced to the Queen, a "Birthnight Ball.

Words-

-of DeKalb

Heroie words, of war, revolution!

Inspiring, stirring the steps to martial tread.

And now, the old house dreams,

Lost to all but its whispering echoes,

Unconscious of Time's cruel changes,

That make its once familiar friends,

Antiquities in a modern era.

But, suddenly through the crumbling walls,

Through the musty air, up from the warped floors,

Shrieking into the

pits of its very soul,

Breaking the spell of centuries,

Crept a loud, deafening roar,

Flashed a vivid light, giving a nacreous luster to thi

cobwebs.

 

 

 

bronze

memoral

tablet

which

reads

"WASHINGTON'S

Heroie words, of war, revolution!

Inspiring, stirring the steps to martial tread.

2

M

P

HEADQUARTERS

(Old City Tavern)

Here Washington recrulted his

first command of provincial troops

In the Great Meadows campaign

in 1754.

• In this house he was quarter-

And now, the old house dreams,

Lost to all but its whispering echoes,

Unconscious of Time's cruel changes,

That make its once familiar friends;

Antiquities in a modern era.

br

Fe

pla

Vini

"I

drla

the f

ed when he recelved hls commis-

son as Major in General Brad-

dock's staff.

* The Arst' celebration of the

Federal constitution took place

here June 28, 1788.

Erected by the Colonial Dames

of America in the State of Vir-

dinia."

But, suddenly through the crumbling walls,

Through the musty air, up from the warped floors,

Shrieking into the pits of its very soul,

Breaking the spell of centuries,

Crept a loud, deafening roar,

Flashed a vivid light, giving a nacreous luster to the

cobwebs.

1Ca

pouring

perity t

actually

ernment,

from

asS

ment"

In 1789

en route

The adjacent and more pre-

tentious bullding bears a similar

Then a discordant cry above it all,

New York

bronze marker Inscribed:

Dispersing its dreams, shattering the tranquillity of

responded to

the Mayor,

"ERECTED 1792

years,

say, from the

Popular resort and famous hos-

"I welcome Washington!"

the popular

telry of the eighteenth century,

-M. Iouise Dinwiddie.

children sang

Here was held in 1798 the Arst

to thelr hero,

celebration of Washington's birth-

Birthnigi

and in other librarles and mut-

day, In which he participated, and

federalism and gratitude kept. pace

After the tarel

from Its steps Washington held

seums.)

with each other,

with the more pl

his last military review and gave

For Renowned Neighbor.

A degression here will explain

Ing adjacent, It lau

his last military order November

One 'of the historic events pub-

the seemingly erroneous date. Feb-

era of social and I

1799.

ruary eleventh.

Erected

shed February 11, 1799, gives an

Accordingly

to

of & larger scale an

by the

the old or Julian calendar (the

Alexandria

account of maneuvers and a sham

birthnight balls were

Chamber of Commerce."

method of reckoning time set by

battle given in honor of George

distingulshed

COL

Notables Met Here.

Jullus Caesar) Washington's birth-

Washington,

their

"neighbor

at

near and far.

The

Historians mentioning the local

day fell on

the eleventh,

tavern

Mount Vernon"

which reads

as

How-

given here in honor

ever, with

among early inns have

the adoption. of the.

follows:

and Queen, were later

chronicled events which bring to

Gregorlan calendar, which super-

The evening was concluded with

by

the very celebration

light the fact that Washington,

& ball and supper at Mr. Gadsby's

ceded the ancient one, Washing-

Ington's blithday,

with

Braddock, Franklin,

LaFayette,

ton's birthday now falls on Feb-

which was much superior to any-

ton and family,

guests

Jefferson,

Baron DeKalb

Tuary. 32,

John

thing

of the

kind

On February 11, 1799,

Paul Jones and other luminarles

ever known

On Market Square.

here.

The company was numerous

of the day met here.

The

tavern was favorably

10-

ton recorded in his diary:

Washing-

and brilliant and beauty of per-

"Went up to Alexandria

ton himself in his diary frequent-

son and excellency of taste,

in

cated on Market Square, then an

celebration

1y mentions his favorite inn, and

open commons, often

the ladles, seemed to vie for

used

for

of my birthdar,

maneuvers were performed b

The Gazettes of the period record

perference,

that statesman met here, and that

The House was bril-

lantly Illuminated and the ball-

brilliant banquets and balls, were

staged at Gadsby's long, long ago.

room adorned with a transparent

likeness of George Washington ex-

(Priceless editions

these

newspapers are in the Rare Book

ecuted in a masterly style.

Thus have the citizens of Alex-

Division of the Library of Con-

andria,

in doing honor to their

gress,

in

the American Antiquar-

an Society's library

at

Worces-

illustrious neighbor, done the high-

est

nonor

to

themselves

and

ter,

Massachusetts,

111.

Harvard

proved to the Union

boar

taer

SHUMAN'S

BAKERY LUNCH

From 11 a. m. 'to 3 p. m.

A GOOD PLACE TO EAT

"Food With a Home-Cooked Taste"

516 King St., Alexandria, Va.

CLEAN

WHOLESOME

this year,

throughout the

world, men who love liberty

pay homage to our great

American, George Washing-

ton.

With infinite gratitude

and reverence we observe the

two hundredth anniversary

of his birth.

B. WHEATLEY

FUNERAL HOME

Since 1849

809 King Street

Modern Equipment-Lady Attendant

Prompt Ambulance Service

Phone Alex. 38

 

 

LO

ion.

the Shenandoah was bullt In 1785,

Alter Yorktown.

On November 20, 1781, the Com-

mander in Chlef left Mt. Vernon

and provided another item of in-

terest by stopping here to thank

his nelghbors for refolcing in

the

fall of Yorktown and for expres-

sing thelr sympathy in his great

lamily

affliction,

the

death

of

MA.

We DIDA

youngest

IVelv

unC

RAI

son.

To

return

Cadsov's-on

June

28,

0188 Washineton

wIOR

Vernon

to

charles

Cotes

Pinckney, described the Arst cele-

bration

of

the

Federal

adoption

of

the

Constitution

when

took

place

at

Gadsby's tayern,

writing

In part:

"Thus the citizens

of Alexan-

dria

when

convened

constituted

the Arst public company in Amer-

Ica

which had

the

pleasure

of

pouring a libation to the pros-

perity of the then states that had

actually adopted the general gov-

ernment,

have

just

returned

from assisting at the entertaln-

ment."

In 1789, when Washington was

en route to his inauguration

in

New York as First President,

he

responded to an address given by

the

Mayor,

Colonel Dennls Ram-

say, from the very doorsteps

of

the

popular

tavern,

800

school

children sang and tossed flowers

to their hero,

"the General."

Birthnight Balls.

After the tavern was enlarged

with the more protentlous build-

ing adjacent, it launched upon an

era of social and political import

of a larger scale and the famous

birthnight balls were

attended by

distingulshed company

from

near

and

far.

The

balls,

Arst

glen here in honor of the

King

and Queen,

were later superceded

by the very celebration

of Wash-

ingbon's

birthday,

with Washing-

ton and family,

guests

of honor

On February 11, 1799, Washing-

ton recorded in his diary:

"Went up to Alexandria

m mhe

celebration of my blrthday,

Many

maneuvers were performed by the

unform corps and an elegant ball

and supper at night."

13039

"February 12: Returned home."

Beautiful colontal panelling and

replace mantles,

also the

nill-

siclans' gallery, are a feature in

the Metropolitan Museum

of Art,

In

New

York

City,

the woodwork

alon

expert y

sklled

artisans,

and

bac

local

ballroom

* RaIn

af

ItS loSt Amosonere of the lone

880,

when

the

, bells

and veauz

Of

the

town

danced

by

candlelight

the

stater minuet.

Popular Proprietor.

Mr. Gadsby, from accounts

in

Gazette of the perlod, was held

in high esteem by his fellow citt-

zens and took a prominent part

in

civlc

endeavors.

Washington

and contemporarles praised espect-

ally the tavern's excellent cutzine.

commenting

on

the

"delicious

roast ducks" and other game, and

the rare wines and other "favor-

ite

vintages,"

served.

The pro-

prietor personally supervised plans

for local tunctlons.

Across from Theatre.

Located •conveniently

"acrass

from the theatre' the

don was

headquarters

of

tine

theatrical

stars of the day. One of the best

known

wag Anne

Warren,

called

engagemen

city

cue

notress

dled

aG

hAP

quarters

SID

Tavern.

Her

Interment

last one in Ohrst church

111

And

Gadsoy?

the

vardo 1808

Washington's Own.

Returning again

to

martial

note,

and

going back

tO

I Tune

1798,

an artillery

company

gath-

ered here known as "Washington's

Own."

They drilled in Market

Square to the admiration of the

tavern patrons.

This company,

headed by Capt.

Wm.

Harper.

prepared for expected war with

France.

These men later

were

given their last milltary order by

beloved chieftaln Washington who

spoke to them from

the tavern

steps,

In

1799

the company

under

Captain

DeNeale,

marched with

the Independent Blues to Mount

Vernon and took part

UIn

baf

funeral cortege of Washington on

December 18, 1799. A full account

of this historical event was glven

Gazette

caan

time.

by's Tavern, until well in the 19th

century. Afterwards It was ne

glected for years and stood a si-

lent "memorial to a procession of

celebritles of by-gone days." Its

restoration br the local Leglon-

nares, alded by their friends, will.

restore

a shrine that will attract

Leadership

Visitors

Welcome.

We invite you to visit and

inspect Alexandria's Ultra-

Modern Beauty Salon.

roughout the

ho love liberty

to our

great

rge Washing-

nite gratitude

re observe the

anniversary

birth.

ITLEY

HOME

119

{treet

Lady Altendant

c. Service

38

WASHINGTON was our country's great.

est leader.

It was he who gained the inde-

pendence of the colonies, he who unified them

under a central government, he who guided

the destinies of the new nation. Even more,

it was he whose breadth of vision made pos-

sible a system of federal administration

which proved adequate, not only to the needs

of his own time, but to the needs of the fu-

ture.

This institution is proud of its leadership,

too.

Its capacity for rendering cleaning par

excellence and the maximum in efficient

service have placed it among Alexandria's

foremost in progressive leadership.

The Colonial

HAIRDRESSING

Blanch Shipley Hughes

Marion

E. Woodberry

Formerly of Hepner's, Washington

110 South Royal St.

Phone Alex. 765

"The Service Cleaners"

SOUTHERN

DRY CLEANING CO

223 No. Payne St

Phone 60-68,

 

 

VIRGINIA SOUVENIR EDITION

parades and celebrations, by the

militia and citizens. During the

exciting days of French and

In-

dian warfare, troops marched and

countermarched here and were

cheered by the public.

Many

of

the boys, partlcularly

in Brad-

dock's campaign bravely marched

away never to return.

Headquarters.

In 1754, Washington, from his

headquarters at Gadsby's was sent

by Governor Dinwiddle to warn

the French agalnst encroaching

upon English who had settled in

the Ohlo valley.

Fallure of this

expedition to the frontier led

to

the Braddock campalgn In 1755.

On Janury 16, 1775, Washing-

ton wrote in his dlary-chron-

cling a visit to his favorite tav-

ern:

"Went up to Alexandria to

review of the Independent Oom-

pany to ohoose a committee for the

County of Fairlax."

On January 26, 1775, he wrote:

"Went up to Alexandria for an

intended

meeting

Od

Trustees.

Stayed alight and bot a parcel

of servants."

Bustling Center.

Within and wiuhout the tavern

was a scene of bustling activity.

Stage

coaches, outriders and the

Post all came to the courtyard in

the rear of Gadsby's and latest

news and fashions from

New

York and Philadelphla came here

to be

disseminated. The court-

yard garden will be restored to its

original color and qualntness by

the Garden Club of Alexandria

In their efforts to ald the Legion

with the restoration project.

It will be remembered that Alex-

andila was a key city of import.

ance, situated between the north-

ern and southern centers

along

the narrow ribbon of the

Thir-

teen Colonies, and also connecting

with the Ohlo and Shenandoah

valley.

According to news pub-

lished in the local press of the

day commissioners of the Turn-

Dike

roads frequently

met

at

Gadsby's

as matters

of

import-

ance

respecting roads constantly

oame

up.

The frst Turnpike

TO

the Shenandoah was bull In 1785.

After Yorktown.

On November 20, 1781, the Com-

mander In Chief left Mt. Veron

The above pictures, reading from

left to right,

are:

(1) Half

cent

stamp

Charles Willson

Peale

portrait of Washington at

age of

25.

(2) One cent stamp-

-Houdon

bust of Washington which Is now

at Mount Vernon.

(3) One and

one-hak cent stamp-Charles WIll-

son Peale portrait

of

Washing-

ton called "Virginia Colonel" por-

uniform corps and an elegant ball

and supper at night.

THE ALEXANDRIA GAZETH?

BICENTENNIAL STAMP SERIES

trait.

(4) Two cent

stamp.

Gil-

bert Stuart portrait of Washing.

ton,

(5) Three

cent

stamp

Charles Willson Peale

portrait

Washington now

in

of

ate

Normal

School, Westchester, Pa.

(6.) Four

cent stamp Charles Wilson Peale

portralt of Washington now

possession

of

in

William

Patten

Rhinebeck,

N.

Y.

(7) Five cent

prietor personally supervised plans

for local functions.

stamp-

Charles Wilson Peale por-

trait of Washington now

in

New

York Historical Society Art

Gal-

lery.

(8) Six-cent

stamp

-John

Trumbull portrait of George Wash-

ington. Now in

Yale University.

(9) Seven cent stamp-John Trum-

bull portralt of George Washing-

ton

now in Metropolitan Museum

of Art, New York City. (10) Eight

spoke to

them

from

steps.

the tavern

cent stamp- Saint-Memin portralt

of George Washington.

(11) Nine

cent stamp

- Portrait of George

Washington

by

William

Wil-

lams. Now in the Masonic Lodge

at Alexandria, Va.

(12) Ten cent

stamp-Gilbert

Stuart portralt of

George Washington now In Metro-

politan

Museum

of

Art.

Known

as

"Glbbs-Channing"

portrait,

by's Tavern, until well in the 10th

 

 

Topics: Civil War, Alexandria, VA, George Washington, Mount Vernon, Royal Street, Prince Street, Christ Church, Gadsby's Tavern, George Washington Masonic Memorial, Carlyle House, Friendship Firehouse, King Street, Alexandria Gazette, Newspaper, Robert E. Lee, Parade, Herbert Hoover, John Pollard, George Washington Memorial Parkway, Railroad, Duke Street, Columbus Street, Rembrandt Peal

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